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Abstracts from Fall 2008 AGU in San Francisco

2008 Fall Meeting          
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HR: 17:24h
AN: U24B-08 INVITED
TI: Toward understanding the role of the atmosphere in pan Arctic change and sea ice loss; an update on the status of focused campaigns under POLARCAT.
AU: * Burkhart, J F
EM: jfb@nilu.no
AF: Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), 19 Instituttveien, Kjeller, 2027, Norway
AU: Bates, T
EM: Tim.Bates@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Brock, C A
EM: charles.a.brock@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305-3337, United States
AU: Clerbaux, C
EM: catherine.clerbaux@aero.jussieu.fr
AF: Service D'Aéronomie, Université Paris VI Tour 45 - Aile 45/46 - 3e et 4e étage - Boite 102 4, place Jussieu, Paris, Cedex 05, France
AU: Crawford, J H
EM: James.H.Crawford@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681- 0001, United States
AU: Dibb, J E
EM: jack.dibb@unh.edu
AF: Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, Morse Hall, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824-3525, United States
AU: Elansky, N
EM: n.f.elansky@mail.ru
AF: Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences Pyzhevsky Lane 3, Moscow, 109017, Russian Federation
AU: Ghan, S
EM: Steve.Ghan@pnl.gov
AF: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN: K9-24, Richlawn, WA 99352, United States
AU: Hirdman, D
EM: dhi@nilu.no
AF: Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), 19 Instituttveien, Kjeller, 2027, Norway
AU: Honrath, R E
EM: reh@mtu.edu
AF: Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, United States
AU: Jacob, D J
EM: djacob@fas.harvard.edu
AF: Harvard University, Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138, United States
AU: Law, K
EM: kathy.law@aero.jussieu.fr
AF: Service D'Aéronomie, Université Paris VI Tour 45 - Aile 45/46 - 3e et 4e étage - Boite 102 4, place Jussieu, Paris, Cedex 05, France
AU: Paris, J
EM: Jean-Daniel.Paris@lsce.ipsl.fr
AF: Climate and Environmental Science Laboratory (LSCE), 4, place Jussieu, Paris, 05 Cedex, France
AU: Quinn, P
EM: Patricia.K.Quinn@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Schlager, H
EM: Hans.Schlager@dlr.de
AF: Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Institut für Physik der Atmosphäre Atmosphärische Spurenstoffe Münchner Straße 20, Oberpfaffenhofen-Wes, 82234, Germany
AU: Singh, H B
EM: Hanwant.B.Singh@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-5, Moffett Field, CA 94035, United States
AU: Sodemann, H
EM: hso@nilu.no
AF: Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), 19 Instituttveien, Kjeller, 2027, Norway
AU: Stohl, A
EM: ast@nilu.no
AF: Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), 19 Instituttveien, Kjeller, 2027, Norway
AB: Sea ice loss reached an extraordinary extent in 2007, decreasing in area more than 2.5 million square kilometres below the 1979 extent. Sea ice loss is one of many Arctic processes resulting from a warming climate. The dynamics of a changing Arctic system are particularly sensitive to climate change and filled with uncertainties and complex feedback mechanisms - most being simply unknown. During the International Polar Year (IPY) a number of international partnerships were formed to establish the Polar Study using Aircraft, Remote Sensing, Surface Measurements and Models, of Climate, Chemistry, Aerosols, and Transport (POLARCAT). Under the umbrella of POLARCAT projects cooperated with national funding to undertake the most comprehensive assessment of air pollution impacts on the Arctic to date. In the spring and summer of 2008 more than 20 institutes from ten nations participated in intensive aircraft, ship, and station-based campaigns with accompanying efforts from the satellite and modelling communities to provide near real time products for mission planning and analysis. The campaigns provided an assessment of the role that tropospheric chemistry, aerosols, and transport play in the Arctic. The spring campaigns focused on anthropogenic pollution, while the summer campaigns targeted biomass burning. During the spring of 2008, over 80 flights were flown by five different aircraft as part of the ARCTAS, ISDAC, ARCPAC, and French POLARCAT campaigns, the ICEALOT campaign commissioned the R/V Knorr to travel over 12,000 km, and numerous specialty satellite and modelling products were developed with near real time distribution. These same products were again used for flight planning and forecasting in the summer when an additional 50+ flights were flown by the ARCTAS, French POLARCAT, Siberian YAK, and GRACE campaigns. Several ground based stations and the Siberian TROICA campaign also conducted intensive operating periods (IOPs). We present an overview of the individual campaigns, anticipated products, and initial "quicklooks" from these activities.
UR: http://www.polarcat.no
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0700 CRYOSPHERE (4540)
SC: Union [U]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0077
TI: The air we breathed; the climatology of a 12, 000 kilometre cruise through the North Atlantic.
AU: * Burkhart, J F
EM: jfb@nilu.no
AF: Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), 19 Instituttveien, Kjeller, 2027, Norway
AU: Quinn, P
EM: patricia.k.quinn@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Bates, T
EM: tim.bates@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Coffman, D
EM: derek.coffman@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Williams, E J
EM: eric.j.williams@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305-3328, United States
AU: Stohl, A
EM: ast@nilu.no
AF: Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), 19 Instituttveien, Kjeller, 2027, Norway
AB: Aerosols have a large effect on radiation transmission in the Arctic troposphere, both directly and indirectly via clouds. The spring IPY POLARCAT project coordinated numerous projects to study transport to the Arctic of aerosols, as well as of air pollution more generally from anthropogenic sources. The NOAA International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic Lower Troposphere (ICEALOT) cruise was conducted aboard the R/V Knorr in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Greenland, Norwegian, and Barents Seas from 41-80 degrees N during March and April of 2008. During the cruise we encountered air masses from a variety of sources including fresh continental outflow, aged plumes, pristine Arctic air pristine Arctic air, marine vessel emissions, and coastal point sources. Results from lagrangian particle dispersion modelling and synoptic meteorological analysis will be described to present a picture of the air we breathed.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0700 CRYOSPHERE (4540)
DE: 1616 Climate variability (1635, 3305, 3309, 4215, 4513)
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 10:57h
AN: A42B-03
TI: Airborne Measurements of Inorganic Bromine during ARCTAS and ARCPAC
AU: * Huey, L G
EM: greg.huey@eas.gatech.edu
AU: Liao, J
EM: jin.liao@eas.gatech.edu
AF: Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332, United States
AU: Neuman, J A
EM: Andy.Neuman@noaa.gov
AF: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Dibb, J
EM: jack.dibb@unh.edu
AF: University of New Hampshire, Morse Hall 39 College Rd., Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Nowak, J
EM: john.nowak@noaa.gov
AF: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Tanner, D
EM: tanner@eas.gatech.edu
AF: Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332, United States
AU: Stickel, R
AF: Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332, United States
AU: Wang, Y
EM: yuhang.wang@eas.gatech.edu
AF: Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332, United States
AU: Song, S
AU: Scheuer, E
AF: University of New Hampshire, Morse Hall 39 College Rd., Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Jordan, C
AF: University of New Hampshire, Morse Hall 39 College Rd., Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Ryerson, T
AF: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Flocke, F
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Dr., Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Weinheimer, A
EM: wein@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Dr., Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Knapp, D
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Dr., Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Montzka, D
EM: montzka@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Dr., Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Pollack, I
EM: pollack@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Dr., Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Cubison, M
EM: michael.cubison@colorado.edu
AF: University of Colorado - Boulder, UCB 215, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Jimenez, J
EM: jose.jimenez@colorado.edu
AF: University of Colorado - Boulder, UCB 215, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Sueper, D
AF: University of Colorado - Boulder, UCB 215, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AB: During spring 2008 inorganic bromine as BrO, Br2, and BrCl were measured by three different chemical ionization mass spectrometers using two different ion chemistries from the NASA DC-8 and the NOAA P3. In addition, soluble bromide (Br-) (similar to "filterable Br-" but not including coarse mode aerosol-associated Br-) was measured with a mist chamber from the NASA DC-8. Research flights by both aircraft (based out of Fairbanks, AK) intercepted ozone depletion events in the marine boundary layer on several occasions. In these events, very high levels of Br2 (up to 20 pptv) and much lower levels of BrCl (less than 2 pptv) were observed. On the DC-8 flights the presence of high soluble bromide levels (up to 50 pptv) were also found to correlate well ozone depletion. BrO levels in the ozone depleted layers were generally found to be lower than Br2 levels and were usually less than 5 pptv. In addition, observations from the DC-8 indicate that significant BrO levels of a pptv were present above the marine boundary layer. However, there was no evidence for Br2 above the marine boundary layer. These observations will be compared to a photochemical model including a bromine mechanism. Finally, the implications for these observations on BrO column densities will be discussed.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0394 Instruments and techniques
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 11:12h
AN: A42B-04
TI: Airborne, Ground-based, and Satellite Measurements of BrO during ARCTAS and ARCPAC
AU: * Salawitch, R
EM: rjs@atmos.umd.edu
AF: University of Maryland, AOSC CSS Bldg 224, College Park, Ma 20742, United States
AU: Wang, Y
EM: yuhang.wang@eas.gatech.edu
AF: Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Ga 30332, United States
AU: Adams, C
EM: cadams@physics.utoronto.ca
AF: University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, On M5S 1A7, Canada
AU: Beck, T
EM: tbeck@atmos.umd.edu
AF: University of Maryland, AOSC CSS Bldg 224, College Park, Ma 20742, United States
AU: Canty, T
EM: tcanty@atmos.umd.edu
AF: University of Maryland, AOSC CSS Bldg 224, College Park, Ma 20742, United States
AU: Chance, K
EM: kchance@nasa.gov
AF: Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, Ma 02138, United States
AU: Chen, G
EM: gao.chen@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, E303, Langley, Va 23681, United States
AU: Choi, S
EM: sungyeon.choi@eas.gatech.edu
AF: Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Ga 30332, United States
AU: Crawford, J H
EM: James.H.Crawford@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, E303, Langley, Va 23681, United States
AU: Dibb, J
EM: jack.dibb@und.edu
AF: University of New Hampshire, 131 Main Street, Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Donohoue, D
EM: ddonohoue@ga.alaska.edu
AF: University of Alaska Fairbanks, Dept of Chemistry & Biology, Fairbanks, AK 99775, United States
AU: Flocke, F
EM: ffl@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, Co 80305, United States
AU: Hendrick, F
EM: Francois.Hendrick@aeronomie.be
AF: Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Avenue Circulaire 3, Brussels, B-1180, Belgium
AU: Huey, G
EM: greg.huey@eas.gatech.edu
AF: Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Ga 30332, United States
AU: Jacob, D
EM: djacob@fas.harvard.edu
AF: Harvard University, 29 Oxford St., Cambridge, Ma 02138, United States
AU: Joiner, J
EM: Joanna.Joiner@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 613.3, Greenbelt, Md 20771, United States
AU: Knapp, D
EM: david@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, Co 80305, United States
AU: Kreher, K
EM: k.kreher@niwa.co.nz
AF: NIWA Lauder, Lauder Private Bag 5006, Omakau Central Otago, 5006, New Zealand
AU: Kurosu, T
EM: tkurosu@cfa.harvard.edu
AF: University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, On M5S 1A7, Canada
AU: Liao, J
EM: Jin.Liao@eas.gatech.edu
AF: Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Ga 30332, United States
AU: Montzka, D
EM: montzka@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, Co 80305, United States
AU: Neuman, A
EM: Andy.Neuman@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth Systen Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, R/CSD 7, Boulder, Co 80302, United States
AU: Parrella, J
EM: parrella@fas.harvard.edu
AF: University of Alaska Fairbanks, Dept of Chemistry & Biology, Fairbanks, AK 99775, United States
AU: Simpson, W
EM: ffwrs@uaf.edu
AF: University of Alaska Fairbanks, Dept of Chemistry & Biology, Fairbanks, AK 99775, United States
AU: Stickel, R
EM: Robert.Stickel@eas.gatech.edu
AF: Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Ga 30332, United States
AU: Strong, K
EM: strong@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca
AF: University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, On M5S 1A7, Canada
AU: Tanner, D
EM: David.Tanner@eas.gatech.edu
AF: Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Ga 30332, United States
AU: Weinheimer, A
EM: wein@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, Co 80305, United States
AU: Michel Van Roozendael, M
EM: Michel.Vanroozendael@oma.be
AF: Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Avenue Circulaire 3, Brussels, B-1180, Belgium
AB: During the spring 2008 phase of NASA ARCTAS (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites) and NOAA ARCPAC (Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate), measurements of BrO and related species were obtained in the Arctic region from in situ aircraft instruments, ground-based spectrometers, and satellite sensors. The field measurements were designed to reveal details about the spring-time phenomena of enhanced Arctic BrO that has been termed the "bromine explosion" and about how tropospheric ozone is removed by enhanced halogens. Surprisingly, regions of enhanced BrO and depleted tropospheric ozone measured by instruments aboard the NASA DC-8 and NOAA P3 aircraft were often not co-located with satellite measurements of elevated total column BrO. Our presentation will be based on the results of a workshop, held during October 2008, that was designed to quantitatively advance our understanding of the relation between the in situ, ground-based, and satellite measurements of BrO obtained during ACCTAS and ARCPAC and of the implications of these measurements for tropospheric ozone photochemistry.
DE: 0312 Air/sea constituent fluxes (3339, 4504)
DE: 0315 Biosphere/atmosphere interactions (0426, 1610)
DE: 0340 Middle atmosphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 17:15h
AN: A14A-06
TI: The Composition of Individual Aerosol Particles over the North Slope of Alaska during ISDAC
AU: * Zelenyuk, A
EM: alla.zelenyuk@pnl.gov
AF: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3335 Q. Ave., Richland, WA 99352,
AU: Imre, D
EM: dimre2b@gmail.com
AF: Imre Consulting, 181 McIntosh Ct., Richland, WA 99352,
AU: Liu, P
EM: Peter.Liu@ec.gc.ca
AF: Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin St., Downsview, ONT M3H 5T4, Canada
AU: Macdonald, A
EM: AnneMarie.Macdonald@ec.gc.ca
AF: Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin St., Downsview, ONT M3H 5T4, Canada
AU: Leaitch, R
EM: Richard.Leaitch@ec.gc.ca
AF: Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin St., Downsview, ONT M3H 5T4, Canada
AB: During the month of April 2008 a single particle mass spectrometer, SPLAT II, was deployed on board the Canadian National Research Council Convair 580 aircraft for participation in the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's main scientific objective was to improve our understanding of the relationship between the properties of aerosol particles over the North Pole and their impact on the regional climate. During ISDAC SPLAT II participated in all 27 flights that lasted slightly over 100 hrs. It measured the size of more than 10 million particles and characterized the composition of over 3 million of them. When sampling in clear air SPLAT II measured a wide range of particle compositions, including sulfates mixed with organics, nitrates mixed with organic, processed and freshly emitted sea-salt, a few dust particles, and a significant number of biomass burning particles. Many of these particle types appeared in aerosol layers that had horizontal and vertical filamentous structures. Biomass burning particles, many of which were transported from Asia, were rather prevalent over the North Slope of Alaska during the campaign. Since one of the main goals of this campaign was to characterize cloud properties, large fraction of the data was collected through the CVI inlet. The ice-clouds sampled in ISDAC had typically very low ice crystal concentrations; correspondingly, when sampled through the CVI inlet the number of characterized particles drops precipitously. Despite the low number concentrations SPLAT was able to measure the size and composition of thousands of ice-nuclei. Since the CVI inlet transmits, in addition to ice crystals, liquid droplets, SPLAT was able to characterize a large number of particles that served as cloud condensation nuclei as well. We will present a preliminary analysis of the single particle data collected during this campaign.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 17:00h
AN: A34C-05
TI: Observations of Peroxy Radicals aboard the NASA DC-8 during ARCTAS - Preliminary Results
AU: * Cantrell, C A
EM: cantrell@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Anderson, R S
EM: rsa@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Mauldin, R L
EM: mauldin@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Kosciuch, E J
EM: kosciuch@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Science Team, A
AF: variety of Universities and National Laboratories, various, various, 00000,
AB: Peroxy radicals (HO2 and HO2+RO2) were measured using CIMS (Chemical Ionization Mass Spectroscopy) with chemical conversion aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft platform during the ARCTAS ( Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites) mission that took place Spring and Summer, 2008. This was the first mission that this instrumentation was deployed on the DC-8. Preliminary data will be examined to illustrate instrument performance and the behavior of free radicals under the various conditions of the study (e.g. springtime boundary layer chemistry, long range transport of Asian emissions, Boreal fires emissions, and California air quality).
UR: http://www.espo.nasa.gov/arctas/
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 14:40h
AN: A13E-05
TI: Aerosol Chemical and Physical Properties Over an Ice-Free Region of the Arctic During the International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic LOwer Troposphere (ICEALOT)
AU: * Bates, T S
EM: tim.bates@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA/PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Quinn, P K
AF: NOAA/PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Coffman, D
AF: NOAA/PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Covert, D S
AF: University of Washington, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Seattle, WA 98195, United States
AU: Shank, L
AF: University of Hawaii, Department of Oceanography, Honolulu, HI 96822, United States
AU: Zatko, M C
AF: Penn State University, Department of Meteorology, University Park, PA 16802, United States
AU: Burkhart, J F
AF: NILU, P.O. Box 100, Kjeller, N-2027, Norway
AB: Atmospheric aerosol particles accumulate during the winter and spring in the Arctic resulting in a phenomenon referred to as "Arctic Haze". Measurements of aerosol properties coupled with chemical transport models are needed to understand changing trends in certain components of the "haze" as well as the climatic impact of these aerosols. During March and April of 2008, an International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic Lower Troposphere (ICEALOT) was conducted aboard the R/V Knorr in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Greenland, Norwegian, and Barents Seas from 41-80 degrees N. Here we report the chemical and physical properties of the aerosol measured during the experiment. FLEXPART back trajectories will be used to assess aerosol sources to the Arctic.
UR: http://saga.pmel.noaa.gov/Field/icealot/index.html
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A41J-0257
TI: Measurements of Ice Nucleation in Arctic Mixed Phase Clouds
AU: * Brooks, S D
EM: sbrooks@tamu.edu
AF: Texas A&M University, Department of Atmospheric Sciences 3150 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, United States
AU: Glen, A
EM: aglen@ariel.met.tamu.edu
AF: Texas A&M University, Department of Atmospheric Sciences 3150 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, United States
AU: Zelenyuk, A N
EM: alla.zelenyuk@pnl.gov
AF: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352, United States
AU: Macdonald, A M
EM: AnneMarie.Macdonald@ec.gc.ca
AF: Environment Canada, Cloud Physics and Severe Weather Research Section, Science and Technology Branch, 4905 Dufferin St., Downsview, Ont M3H 5T4, Canada
AU: Liu, P
EM: Peter.Liu@ec.gc.ca
AF: Environment Canada, Cloud Physics and Severe Weather Research Section, Science and Technology Branch, 4905 Dufferin St., Downsview, Ont M3H 5T4, Canada
AU: Leaitch, R
EM: Richard.Leaitch@ec.gc.ca
AF: Environment Canada, Cloud Physics and Severe Weather Research Section, Science and Technology Branch, 4905 Dufferin St., Downsview, Ont M3H 5T4, Canada
AB: Here we present in-flight measurements of ice nuclei (IN) data collected with a Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC) from onboard the Canadian Convair during the recent Indirect and Semidirect Effects of Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). During ISDAC, Arctic haze containing aerosols from several distinctly different sources including Asian dust and Siberia coal fire plants, were sampled. The corresponding range in aerosol-cloud interactions and overall influence of outside aerosol masses on the Arctic atmosphere was variable as well. During the project, ice nuclei were sampled in-cloud and out-of-cloud and in the presence of multiple distinct aerosol layers. The CFDC was operated at controlled temperatures in the range of -10 degrees C to -40 degrees C and over a wide range of supersaturations with respect to ice. Observed IN concentrations varied from frequent values of 0.01 per liter to spikes as high as approximately 10 per liter during Arctic haze events. The multiple factors contributing to this high degree of variability in ice nuclei will be discussed in an effort to determine what drives ice nucleation in mixed phase clouds in the Arctic.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0320 Cloud physics and chemistry
DE: 0321 Cloud/radiation interaction
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A41E-0148
TI: Observing the Indirect Effect at North Slope of Alaska: Spectroscopic Lessons for Future Satellite Missions
AU: Vogelmann, A M
EM: vogelmann@bnl.gov
AF: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Atmospheric Sciences Division, Upton, NY 11973, United States
AU: * Lubin, D
EM: dlubin@ucsd.edu
AF: Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093- 0221, United States
AB: The high Arctic is perhaps the best natural laboratory for studying the aerosol first indirect effect (IDE), as its meteorology involves (1) low-level stratiform cloud cover as the predominant sky condition, (2) pervasive anthropogenic aerosol burden (Arctic haze) throughout winter and spring, and (3) a contrasting clean-air scenario during autumn. Several ground-based observational and multi-phase cloud modeling studies have demonstrated the existence of the Arctic IDE, particularly in its longwave manifestation. Detection and monitoring of the Arctic IDE from existing spacecraft instruments remains challenging, however, because of the high albedo surface that prevails through most of the spring season. During the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Monitoring (ARM) program's Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), we deployed a shortwave visible and near-IR spectroradiometer at Barrow, Alaska, during April-May 2008. This instrument measured downwelling spectral irradiance, over the wavelength range 350-2200 nm, in one-minute intervals continuously throughout the field program. ISDAC also involved numerous coordinated overflights of Barrow by NASA and Environment Canada research aircraft making in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties. We show how spectral measurements of the radiation field in the 1.6 and 2.2 μm windows can be used to retrieve cloud thermodynamic phase, optical depth, and effective particle size, and how such retrievals can be used to detect and quantify the Arctic IDE. These results provide suggestions for (1) methods to detect the IDE in the Arctic from sensors such as MODIS, and (2) how future satellite missions might be configured for improved IDE studies, in particular, through enhanced spectral resolution at wavelengths longer than 1 μm.
DE: 0321 Cloud/radiation interaction
DE: 3311 Clouds and aerosols
DE: 3349 Polar meteorology
DE: 3359 Radiative processes
DE: 3360 Remote sensing
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 16:00h
AN: A14A-01
TI: PANs in the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans in Springtime 2008
AU: * Roberts, J M
EM: James.M.Roberts@noaa.gov
AF: Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA/ESRL, R/CSD-7 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Williams, E J
EM: Eric.J.Williams@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences, NOAA and University of Colorado, Boulder, 216 UCB University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Williams, E J
EM: Eric.J.Williams@noaa.gov
AF: Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA/ESRL, R/CSD-7 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Lerner, B M
EM: Brian.Lerner@noaa.gvov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences, NOAA and University of Colorado, Boulder, 216 UCB University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Lerner, B M
EM: Brian.Lerner@noaa.gvov
AF: Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA/ESRL, R/CSD-7 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Gilman, J
EM: Jessica.Gilman@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences, NOAA and University of Colorado, Boulder, 216 UCB University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Gilman, J
EM: Jessica.Gilman@noaa.gov
AF: Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA/ESRL, R/CSD-7 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Kuster, W C
EM: William.C.Kuster@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences, NOAA and University of Colorado, Boulder, 216 UCB University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Kuster, W C
EM: William.C.Kuster@noaa.gov
AF: Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA/ESRL, R/CSD-7 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AB: PANs, (acyl peroxynitrates), are often the most abundant odd-nitrogen (NOy) species in the Northern Hemisphere low-temperature environments. As a result, PANs transport, and subsequent thermal decomposition to NO2, represent a major source of NOx to the background troposphere. Measurements of PAN and PPN were made aboard the R/V Knorr during ICEALOT (International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic Lower Troposphere) project. The compound concentrations and their systematic dependency on air-mass origin and transport will be presented in the context of other geographical and seasonal sources of NOy to the remote atmosphere.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0093
TI: Investigation of tracer emission and transport in GEOS-5 during ARCTAS
AU: * Bian, H
EM: huisheng.bian@nasa.gov
AF: University of Maryland Baltimore County, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, mail stop 613.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771, United States
AU: Chin, M
EM: mian.chin@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, mail stop 613.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771, United States
AU: Colarco, P
EM: peter.r.colarco@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, mail stop 613.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771, United States
AU: Warner, J
EM: juying@umbc.edu
AF: University of Maryland Baltimore County, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, mail stop 613.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771, United States
AU: de Silva, A
EM: arlindo.dasilva@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, mail stop 613.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771, United States
AU: Chu, A
EM: Allen.Chu@nasa.gov
AF: University of Maryland Baltimore County, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, mail stop 613.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771, United States
AU: Kawa, R
EM: stephan.r.kawa@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, mail stop 613.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771, United States
AB: The NASA aircraft experiment, Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS), was conducted during April, 2008 at Fairbanks, Alaska and June - July, 2008 at Cold Lake, Canada. During ARCTAS the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office ran 0.5 x 0.666 degree global 5-day forecasts of the Goddard Earth Observing System atmospheric general circulation model and data assimilation system (GEOS-5). In addition to meteorological fields, the GEOS-5 provided atmospheric distributions of aerosols, CO, and other tracers for flight planning and for data analysis. Here we examine the comparison of GEOS5 CO and aerosol with observations from the ARCTAS mission to evaluate model's sources, sinks, chemistry, and transport. We particularly highlight the events of Asian anthropogenic long- range transport during spring phase and biomass burning emission and transport during summer phase and their impact on Arctic pollution.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0317 Chemical kinetic and photochemical properties
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0086
TI: Airborne measurements of biomass burning aerosol distribution and composition in the springtime Arctic 2008
AU: Thornberry, T
EM: Troy.Thornberry@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Thornberry, T
EM: Troy.Thornberry@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: * Froyd, K D
EM: Karl.Froyd@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: * Froyd, K D
EM: Karl.Froyd@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Murphy, D M
EM: Daniel.M.Murphy@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Thomson, D S
EM: dthomson@dropletmeasurement.com
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Thomson, D S
EM: dthomson@dropletmeasurement.com
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Brock, C A
EM: Charles.A.Brock@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Cozic, J
EM: Julie.Cozic@noaa.gov
AF: Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI, Villigen PSI, 5232, Switzerland
AU: Cozic, J
EM: Julie.Cozic@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Warneke, C
EM: Carsten.Warneke@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Warneke, C
EM: Carsten.Warneke@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: deGouw, J
EM: Joost.deGouw@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: deGouw, J
EM: Joost.deGouw@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Middlebrook, A M
EM: Ann.M.Middlebrook@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Bahreini, R
EM: Roya.Bahreini@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Bahreini, R
EM: Roya.Bahreini@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Brioude, J
EM: Jerome.Brioude@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Brioude, J
EM: Jerome.Brioude@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AB: The springtime Arctic troposphere in 2008 was characterized by high concentrations of biomass burning aerosol. During the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC) campaign, airborne measurements of aerosol composition by the NOAA single particle mass spectrometer instrument (PALMS) identified biomass burning particles using an established composition tracer. Fires in northern Asia produced biomass burning aerosol that were transported to the Arctic within 3-12 days. Concentrations of biomass burning aerosols were elevated not only within well defined plumes, but also regionally throughout the Arctic. Above the boundary layer, biomass burning particles dominated the total aerosol volume and were largely responsible for the Arctic Haze observed during the period of study. The composition of plume aerosols varied according to source region, transport time, and anthropogenic influence.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0101
TI: Observations and Comparison of SO2 Measurements Aboard the NOAA P-3 during ARCPAC
AU: * Nowak, J B
EM: John.Nowak@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA, Earth System Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: * Nowak, J B
EM: John.Nowak@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Holloway, J S
EM: John.S.Holloway@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA, Earth System Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Holloway, J S
EM: John.S.Holloway@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Neuman, J A
EM: Andy.Neuman@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA, Earth System Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Neuman, J A
EM: Andy.Neuman@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Fehsenfeld, F C
EM: Fred.C.Fehsenfeld@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA, Earth System Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Fehsenfeld, F C
EM: Fred.C.Fehsenfeld@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AB: Instrument inter-comparisons play a crucial role in the successful execution of atmospheric measurement campaigns. The ability to quantify agreement among instruments that measure atmospheric compounds lends credence to the individual measurements and extends the scope of the overall study. One such measurement is that of sulfur dioxide (SO2). SO2 is the predominant anthropogenic sulfur- containing air pollutant. It plays an important role in the atmospheric sulfur cycle through its contribution to acidic aerosol formation, aerosol and cloud droplet modification, and acidic precipitation. Due to its large indirect impact on climate it is important to precisely know its sources, sinks and its atmospheric distribution. A modified TECO 43C-TL pulsed fluorescence instrument and a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS), were both deployed aboard the NOAA P-3 aircraft to measure SO2 during the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC) field program. The detection technique, sampling configuration, and calibration methods of the instruments are described. The performance of each instrument is assessed using ambient data to examine detection sensitivity, background signal, and time response. Lastly, an evaluation of the comparative performance of the two measurements is presented, as are preliminary results examining both the Arctic SO2 distribution observed from the NOAA P-3 and SO2 emissions from the Fairbanks urban area.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
DE: 0394 Instruments and techniques
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 13:55h
AN: A13E-02
TI: Optical Properties and Climate Impacts of Tropospheric Aerosols that Undergo Long- Range Transport to the Arctic
AU: * Quinn, P
EM: patricia.k.quinn@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, 98115,
AU: Bates, T
AF: NOAA PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, 98115,
AU: Coffman, D
AF: NOAA PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, 98115,
AU: Covert, D
AF: NOAA PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, 98115,
AU: Schulz, K
AF: NOAA PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, 98115,
AU: Shank, L
AF: NOAA PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, 98115,
AU: Murthy, P
AF: NOAA PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, 98115,
AU: Jefferson, A
AF: NOAA ESRL, 325 Broadway, Boulder, 80305,
AU: Ogren, J
AF: NOAA ESRL, 325 Broadway, Boulder, 80305,
AU: Burkhart, J
AF: NILU, P.O. Box 100, Kjeller, 2720, Norway
AB: Tropospheric aerosol particles undergo long range transport from the mid-latitudes to the Arctic each winter and spring. Once in the Arctic, aerosols may impact the regional climate in several ways. Aerosols can affect climate directly by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation and indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and altering cloud properties. In addition, absorbing aerosol that is deposited onto ice and snow can lower the surface albedo and enhance the ice-albedo feedback mechanism. Measurements of aerosol properties relevant to climate forcing (chemical composition, light scattering, and light absorption) have been made by NOAA at Barrow, AK for over a decade. In addition, in March and April of 2008, aerosol measurements were made during a NOAA research cruise (ICEALOT) to the Greenland, Norwegian and Barents Seas. Onboard the ship, measurements were made of aerosol optical and cloud nucleating properties. Results from the long-term measurements and ICEALOT will be presented in order to describe trends and climate-relevant properties of aerosol particles transported to the Arctic.
UR: http://saga.pmel.noaa.gov/
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0320 Cloud physics and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: B51A-0351
TI: Combined Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Information and Airborne Measurements in Support of NASA ARCTAS and TC4 Field Campaigns
AU: * Choi, K
EM: minic3000@gmail.com
AF: Department of advanced technology fusion, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul, 143-707, Korea, Republic of
AU: Woo, J
EM: woojh21@gmail.com
AF: Department of advanced technology fusion, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul, 143-707, Korea, Republic of
AU: Vay, S A
EM: Stephanie.A.Vay@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 483, Hampton, VA 23681-2199, United States
AU: Choi, Y
EM: Yonghoon.Choi-1@nasa.gov
AF: National Institute of Aerospace, Mail Stop 401A, Hampton, VA 23681-2199, United States
AU: Ma, Y
EM: bluesky0002@gmail.com
AF: Department of Environmental Engineering, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul, 143-707, Korea, Republic of
AU: Jung, B
EM: bujeon.jung@gmail.com
AF: Department of advanced technology fusion, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul, 143-707, Korea, Republic of
AU: Sunwoo, Y
EM: ysunwoo@konkuk.ac.kr
AF: Department of advanced technology fusion, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul, 143-707, Korea, Republic of
AB: The Tropical Composition, Clouds, and Climate, Coupling experiment (TC4) was an airborne campaign conducted during July and August in 2007 to investigate the structures, properties, and processes of the upper troposphere within the tropics. In April and July of 2008, NASA also sponsored the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) mission that coincided with other International Polar Year (IPY) activities seeking to better understand the behavior of Polar Regions and their roles in the broader Earth System. High-resolution carbon dioxide measurements made onboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft during TC4 and ARCTAS offer the opportunity to broaden our understanding of the atmospheric behavior of carbon dioxide (CO2) for Arctic and Tropical regions. An emissions inventory and processing methodology have been developed to elucidate the influence of emissions on the regional atmospheric CO2 concentration. Remote Sensing-based land cover information has also been included to analyze the effect of plant uptake and respiration. The results of our combined data analysis will be presented at the conference.
DE: 5405 Atmospheres (0343, 1060)
DE: 5462 Polar regions
SC: Biogeosciences [B]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0102
TI: Behavior of OH, H2SO4, and MSA during ARCTAS
AU: Kosciuch, E
EM: kosciuch@ucar.edu
AF: ACD/NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa, Boulder, CO 80303, United States
AU: * Mauldin, L
EM: mauldin@ucar.edu
AF: ACD/NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa, Boulder, CO 80303, United States
AU: Anderson, R
EM: rsa@ucar.edu
AF: ACD/NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa, Boulder, CO 80303, United States
AU: Cantrell, C
EM: cantrell@ucar.edu
AF: ACD/NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa, Boulder, CO 80303, United States
AU: Weinheimer, A
EM: wein@ucar.edu
AF: ACD/NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa, Boulder, CO 80303, United States
AU: Knapp, D
EM: david@ucar.edu
AF: ACD/NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa, Boulder, CO 80303, United States
AU: Huey, G
EM: greg.huey@eas.gatech.edu
AF: School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences/Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst St., Atlanta, CO 30332, United States
AB: The NASA ARCTAS study presented a very unique opportunity to investigate the tropospheric chemistry of the Arctic environment, both rural and urban areas of California, and plumes and outflows from boreal fires in northern Canada. Here OH, H2SO4, and MSA data obtained from the NASA DC-8 will be presented. OH showed a large variation depending upon the type of environment sampled with values as low as 2-3 x 105 molecule cm-3 in the clean Arctic to well over 107 molecule cm-3 in urban areas or fire plumes. Values from H2SO4 reveal broad sources of sulfur outflow from both the L.A. and San Francisco regions with concentrations as high as 1x108 molecule cm-3. H2SO4 concentrations from the Arctic were highly varied with values ranging from 3-5x105 to 1x108 molecule cm-3. Observations of MSA, a product of DMS oxidation and presumably of marine origin, help to distinguish air masses with a marine contribution, however measurements from this study may indicate that there are also industrial sources of this species.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0317 Chemical kinetic and photochemical properties
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0399 General or miscellaneous
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0100
TI: Distribution of Sulfate Aerosol over Northern North America and the Arctic Ocean during April, 2008
AU: * Scheuer, E
EM: eric.scheuer@unh.edu
AF: Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, 8 College Road University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824,
AU: Dibb, J E
EM: jack.dibb@unh.edu
AF: Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, 8 College Road University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824,
AU: Jordan, C
EM: carolyn.jordan@unh.edu
AF: Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, 8 College Road University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824,
AB: The NASA DC-8 conducted seven science and two transit flights during phase one of the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) campaign. Of these flights, three were local science flights from Fairbanks, Alaska, targeting the atmosphere over Alaska, the Bering Sea, and the Arctic Ocean north of Alaska. The other four science flights were overnight pairs from Fairbanks to Thule, Greenland and to Iqaluit, Nunavut. The overnight flights extended to the eastern Arctic near and north of Greenland. During all flights, fine (submicron) SO4= was measured at 90 second resolution using the paired mist chamber/ion chromatograph technique. Plumes of greatly enhanced SO4= were observed throughout the ARCTAS study region, but there was a significant difference in the background levels between the western and eastern regions sampled. Geometric mean mixing ratios in 1 km altitude bins below 6 km ranged from 245 to315 pptv west of 100° longitude compared to 170- 235 pptv to the east. In both regions observed mixing ratios were generally lower at higher altitudes. Bulk filter samples (5 - 10 minute resolution) indicate that the sulfate aerosol in the eastern region (and high Arctic) is dominantly a mixture of H2SO4 and NH4HSO4, compared to a mix of NH4HSO4 and (NH4)2SO4 over Alaska. These differences appear to reflect strong impact of Asian outflow on the airmasses sampled over the Bering Sea and Alaska compared to a mix of North American and European sources influencing the eastern Canadian Arctic and the Arctic Ocean north of Greenland. Surprisingly, the vertical profile of SO4= below 6 km in the eastern ARCTAS region was very similar to those observed during two April missions in the same broad region sampled as part of TOPSE in 2000.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 14:10h
AN: A13E-03
TI: Biomass burning in Siberia and Kazakhstan as the main source for Arctic Haze over the Alaskan Arctic in April 2008
AU: * Warneke, C
EM: carsten.warneke@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, University of Colorado, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: * Warneke, C
EM: carsten.warneke@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Bahreini, R
EM: Roya.Bahreini@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Bahreini, R
EM: Roya.Bahreini@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, University of Colorado, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Brioude, J
EM: Jerome.Brioude@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Brioude, J
EM: Jerome.Brioude@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, University of Colorado, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Brock, C A
EM: Charles.A.Brock@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: de Gouw, J A
EM: Joost.deGouw@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, University of Colorado, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: de Gouw, J A
EM: Joost.deGouw@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Froyd, K D
EM: Karl.Froyd@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Froyd, K D
EM: Karl.Froyd@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, University of Colorado, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Holloway, J S
EM: John.S.Holloway@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, University of Colorado, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Holloway, J S
EM: John.S.Holloway@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Middlebrook, A M
EM: Ann.M.Middlebrook@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Miller, L
EM: Lloyd.Miller@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, GMD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Montzka, S A
EM: Stephen.A.Montzka@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, GMD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Murphy, D M
EM: Daniel.M.Murphy@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Peischl, J
EM: Jeff.Peischl@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, University of Colorado, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Peischl, J
EM: Jeff.Peischl@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Ryerson, T B
EM: Thomas.B.Ryerson@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Schwarz, J P
EM: Joshua.P.Schwarz@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Schwarz, J P
EM: Joshua.P.Schwarz@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, University of Colorado, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Spackman, R
EM: Ryan.Spackman@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, University of Colorado, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Spackman, R
EM: Ryan.Spackman@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, CSD, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AB: During the airborne field experiment ARCPAC (Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate) in April in northern Alaska, more than 50 pollution plumes were encountered at altitudes between the surface and the highest flight level of 6.5 km. The measurements onboard the NOAA WP-3 aircraft and the Lagrangian transport model FLEXPART showed that the plumes were emitted by forest fires in the Lake Baikal area of Siberia and by agricultural burning in Kazakhstan and southern Russia. Emissions from the two fire types were chemically different with higher enhancement ratios relative to CO for most gas and aerosol species from the agricultural fires. These biomass burning emissions were the dominant contributor to the Arctic Haze encountered in this area during April. In 2008, the fire season started earlier than usual in Siberia, which may have resulted in a more efficient transport of biomass burning emissions into the polar dome thereby further increasing the already strong influence of boreal forest fire emissions on Arctic Haze. FLEXPART compared quantitatively well to the measurements and therefore can be used to quantitatively determine the total amount of CO and other trace gases and aerosol injected into the Arctic from biomass burning and anthropogenic sources during the ARCPAC period.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0322 Constituent sources and sinks
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0096
TI: Micro-pulse Lidar Observations of the Arctic Haze During ICEALOT 2008
AU: * Sawyer, V R
EM: vrf2@unh.edu
AF: University of New Hampshire Climate Change Research Center, Morse Hall 8 College Rd, Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Kelly, P
EM: pkelly@gust.sr.unh.edu
AF: University of New Hampshire Climate Change Research Center, Morse Hall 8 College Rd, Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Welton, E J
EM: Ellsworth.J.Welton@nasa.gov
AF: NASA GSFC, Code 613.1, Greenbelt, MD 20771, United States
AU: Talbot, R
EM: robert.talbot@unh.edu
AF: University of New Hampshire Climate Change Research Center, Morse Hall 8 College Rd, Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Varner, R K
EM: ruth.varner@unh.edu
AF: University of New Hampshire Climate Change Research Center, Morse Hall 8 College Rd, Durham, NH 03824, United States
AB: The annual peak concentration of atmospheric aerosols above the Arctic occurs in March and April in an event called the Arctic haze, which has implications for climate and ecosystem health. The NOAA-funded International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic Lower Troposphere (ICEALOT) campaign traveled to the Barents Sea aboard the R/V Knorr, beginning in Woods Hole, MA on March 19, 2008 and ending in Reykjavik, Iceland on April 24. During that time, a variety of instruments observed the Arctic haze. The University of New Hampshire's AIRMAP program contributed a micro-pulse aerosol lidar (affiliated with NASA MPLNET) to the suite of instruments. The lidar allowed detection of the planetary boundary layer, clouds, and elevated aerosols. Results show examples of Arctic haze events, especially of aerosols within the planetary boundary layer and in the lower free troposphere between 1 and 10 km altitude. Overpasses by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission, which includes its own aerosol backscatter lidar, and trajectory and chemical model output to interpret atmospheric dynamics were used to support interpretation of lidar data. Particulate pollution in the Arctic can be traced to specific midlatitude emissions sources, showing evidence of long-range atmospheric transport. Interaction between Arctic aerosols and the planetary boundary layer also occurs.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 3307 Boundary layer processes
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 16:15h
AN: B24A-02
TI: Analysis of boundary layer methane, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide measurements over California during the ARCTAS/CARB flights
AU: * Diskin, G S
EM: glenn.s.diskin@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 483, Hampton, VA 23681,
AU: Vay, S A
EM: stephanie.a.vay@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 483, Hampton, VA 23681,
AU: Sachse, G W
EM: glen.w.sachse@nasa.gov
AF: National Institute of Aerospace, NASA Langley Research Center Mail Stop 483, Hampton, VA 23681,
AU: Choi, Y
EM: yonghoon.choi-1@nasa.gov
AF: National Institute of Aerospace, NASA Langley Research Center Mail Stop 483, Hampton, VA 23681,
AU: Crawford, J H
EM: james.h.crawford@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 483, Hampton, VA 23681,
AU: Rana, M
EM: mario.rana@nasa.gov
AF: ATK Aerospace, NASA Langley Research Center Mail Stop 483, Hampton, VA 23681,
AU: Slate, T A
EM: thomas.a.slate@nasa.gov
AF: ATK Aerospace, NASA Langley Research Center Mail Stop 483, Hampton, VA 23681,
AB: High precision, 1-sec resolution, in situ measurements of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), and carbon monoxide (CO) were made on board the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the summer 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) and California Air Resources Board (CARB) deployments. The first 4 CARB flights on June 18, 20, 22 and 24 and the ARCTAS transit flights (between Palmdale, CA and Cold Lake, Alberta on June 26 and July 13) include many hours of low-level (~1000 ft AGL) boundary layer sampling over varied geographical regions (e.g. Los Angeles and its shipping lanes, the Central Valley, and croplands near Sacramento) before and during the California wildfires. We investigate highly-correlated time series of CH4, N2O, CO2 and CO to characterize emissions from a variety of sources including urban centers, agricultural lands, oil fields, rice paddies, feed lots, wooded regions, wildfire smoke plumes, etc.
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0420 Biomolecular and chemical tracers
DE: 0428 Carbon cycling (4806)
SC: Biogeosciences [B]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0097
TI: Tropospheric ozone surface depletion (spring) and pollution (summer) in 2008 from the ARCTAS Intensive Ozonesonde Network Study (ARC-IONS) soundings
AU: * Thompson, A M
EM: anne@met.psu.edu
AF: The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology, 503 Walker Building, University Park, PA 16802-5013, United States
AU: Luzik, A M
EM: aml500@psu.edu
AF: The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology, 503 Walker Building, University Park, PA 16802-5013, United States
AU: Doughty, D C
EM: dcd167@psu.edu
AF: The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology, 503 Walker Building, University Park, PA 16802-5013, United States
AU: Gallagher, S D
EM: sdg5019@psu.edu
AF: The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology, 503 Walker Building, University Park, PA 16802-5013, United States
AU: Miller, S K
EM: smiller@meteo.psu.edu
AF: The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology, 503 Walker Building, University Park, PA 16802-5013, United States
AU: Oltmans, S J
EM: samuel.j.oltmans@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA/GMD-ESRL, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Tarasick, D W
EM: david.tarasick@ec.gc.ca
AF: Environment Canada/MSC, 4905 Dufferin Street, Downsview, ON M3H 5T4, Canada
AU: Witte, J C
EM: jacquelyn.witte@nasa.gov
AF: SSAI of Lanham, MD 20706 USA; also at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771, United States
AU: Bryan, A M
EM: alex.bryan@valpo.edu
AF: Valparaiso Univ, Valparaiso Univ, Valparaiso, IN 46383, United States
AU: Walker, T
EM: twalker@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca
AF: Univ of Toronto, Physics Dept., 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A7, United States
AU: Osterman, G B
EM: Gregory.Osterman@jpl.nasa.gov
AF: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive MS 183-601, Pasadena, CA 91801, United States
AU: Worden, J
EM: john.worden@jpl.nasa.gov.
AF: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive MS 183-601, Pasadena, CA 91801, United States
AB: During NASA's ARCTAS (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere with Aircraft and Satellites; http://espo.nasa.gov/arctas) spring and summer 2008 campaigns, an ozonesonde network, ARC- IONS (ARCTAS Intensive Ozonesonde Network Study), launched ozonesonde-radiosonde packages each day (1-20 April, 26 June-12 July) during the A-Train satellite constellation overpass, ~1300 local. Seventeen ARC-IONS stations were located across the northern tier of North America, over both Alaska and Canada, with one site in Greenland and two in the western US; map at (http://croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/arcions). In addition to satellite validation, the soundings provided a coherent, well-distributed set of ozone profiles for: (1) comparison with and interpretation of airborne measurements; (2) complementarity to ARCTAS and IPY (International Polar Year) ground bases at Greenland, Barrow, Eureka, Yellowknife; (3) model evaluation; (4) investigations of processes affecting day-to-day ozone variability. Two aspects of tropospheric ozone variability are described here. First, ozone depletion likely associated with rapid halogen reactions, is prominent in spring at Barrow (71N, 157W) and Resolute (75N, 95W). Second, during summer, relationships among long-range transport of Asian pollution (industrial and fires), California and Canadian fires and daily ozone budgets are established with trajectories, satellite smoke/fire data and laminar identification, the latter method developed in Thompson et al. (2007) and Yorks et al. (2008). Canadian maritime stations display eastern seaboard pollution and stratospheric influences as in IONS-04 (INTEX Ozonesonde Network Study).
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 3360 Remote sensing
DE: 3362 Stratosphere/troposphere interactions
DE: 9315 Arctic region (0718, 4207)
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0078
TI: Measurements of Reactive Nitrogen Species From R/V Knorr During ICEALOT
AU: * Williams, E J
EM: eric.j.williams@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES/University of Colorado, CB 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: * Williams, E J
EM: eric.j.williams@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA/ESRL/CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Lerner, B M
AF: CIRES/University of Colorado, CB 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Lerner, B M
AF: NOAA/ESRL/CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Roberts, J M
AF: NOAA/ESRL/CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Gilman, J B
AF: CIRES/University of Colorado, CB 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Gilman, J B
AF: NOAA/ESRL/CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Kuster, W C
AF: NOAA/ESRL/CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: deGouw, J A
AF: CIRES/University of Colorado, CB 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: deGouw, J A
AF: NOAA/ESRL/CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AB: The International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic Lower Troposphere (ICEALOT) was an International Polar Year research activity to explore the sources, transport, and chemical processing of aerosol and gas phase species in the Arctic marine boundary layer. Measurements were conducted aboard the research vessel Knorr north of 60 N from March 31 to April 24, 2008. The cruise track included portions of the Norwegian, Barents, and Greenland Seas between 20 W and 30 E. The highest latitude achieved was 80 N, at the sea ice edge north of Svalbard. Measurements of individual reactive nitrogen species included NO, NO2, PAN, PPN, alkyl nitrates (C1-C3), and NOy (but not HNO3). With the exception of ports and near-shore source regions (Kola Peninsula), NOy ranged from 0.2 to 1.0 ppbv with a mean value of approximately 0.5 ppbv. The dominant individually measured NOy component was PAN which ranged from 0.05 to 0.35 ppbv with a mean value of approximately 0.24 ppbv. Mixing ratios of PPN ranged from 0.004 to 0.084 ppbv with a mean value of 0.044 ppbv. Mixing ratios of NOx were generally similar to PPN, with some periods when NOx was lower and some periods when PPN was lower. Mixing ratios of alkyl nitrates were typically quite low with 2-propyl nitrate levels higher than ethyl nitrate, which was higher than methyl nitrate. However, there were some episodes when methyl nitrate was present at levels higher than the others. Because HNO3 was not measured individually, we cannot conclude that the reactive nitrogen species budget was balanced. However, if the apparent deficit between the measured NOy and the sum of the individual NOy species is attributed to HNO3, then that compound is present in the Arctic atmosphere at levels substantially higher than previously measured.
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 17:30h
AN: A14A-07
TI: Airborne Photoacoustic Observations of Aerosol Optical Properties Aloft Alaska: Quantifying Aerosol Radiative Forcing in the Arctic
AU: * Dubey, M K
EM: dubey@lanl.gov
AF: Los Alamos National Laboratory, Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, MS D462, LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87542, United States
AU: Mazzoleni, C
EM: cmazzoleni@mtu.edu
AF: Michigan Technological Univerity, Physics Department Fisher Hall 109, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931, United States
AU: Zelenyuk, A
EM: alla.zelenyuk@pnl.gov
AF: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3335 Q. Ave. P.O. Box 999, MSIN K8-88, Richmond, WA 99352, United States
AB: Los Alamos deployed the world's first 3-laser aerosol photoacoustic and nephelopmeter instrument on a Canadian Convair-580 aircraft in April 2008 for DOE's Indirect and Semidirect Effects of Aerosols (ISDAC) campaign (www.arm.gov). Our instrument measured aerosol absorption, scattering and single scattering albedo at 405, 532, and 781 nm. There were 42 complementary measurements of cloud microphysics, aerosol chemistry, and ice composition. On numerous flights we intercepted and interrogated pervasive pollution layers aloft Alaska. The absorption and scattering signals occurred in layers from 1 to 6 km above the surface and approached 200 to 30 (Mm)-1 respectively. Alternating light and dark aerosol layers with single scatter albedo ranging from 0.7 to 0.95 were evident, and they extended over vast areas. Real time satellite data assimilated transport models indicate that this pollution was imported from Chinese dust storms and Siberian fires as well as from Eurasian energy sectors. Our wavelength dependent optical properties are used to diagnose the soot, dust, sulfate and organic components of this complex soup of pollutants. We are testing the fidelity of our diagnostics by analyzing chemical compositions from a single particle laser ablation spectrometer instrument developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We use our optical observations to estimate a direct radiative forcing by pollution of the order of 10 to 30 of W m- 2. This forcing by aerosols is much larger than that by greenhouse gases. Our results underscore the need to accurately treat long range pollution transport in models to simulate the observed rapid melting of the Arctic ice sheet.
UR: http://aerosols.lanl.gov/
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0360 Radiation: transmission and scattering
DE: 0726 Ice sheets
DE: 1637 Regional climate change
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 16:30h
AN: A14A-03
TI: Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Measured in the Arctic Aboard the R/V Knorr During ICEALOT 2008: Primary Sources and Evidence of Halogen Oxidation
AU: * Gilman, J B
EM: jessica.gilman@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: * Gilman, J B
EM: jessica.gilman@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA/ESRL/CSD, 325 Broadway CSD/7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Kuster, W C
EM: william.c.kuster@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA/ESRL/CSD, 325 Broadway CSD/7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Goldan, P D
EM: paul.d.goldan@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Goldan, P D
EM: paul.d.goldan@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA/ESRL/CSD, 325 Broadway CSD/7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Lerner, B M
EM: brian.lerner@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Lerner, B M
EM: brian.lerner@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA/ESRL/CSD, 325 Broadway CSD/7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Williams, E J
EM: eric.j.williams@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Williams, E J
EM: eric.j.williams@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA/ESRL/CSD, 325 Broadway CSD/7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: de Gouw, J A
EM: joost.degouw@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: de Gouw, J A
EM: joost.degouw@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA/ESRL/CSD, 325 Broadway CSD/7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AB: A full suite of gas-phase compounds were measured in-situ aboard the R/V Knorr as part of the International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic Lower Troposphere (ICEALOT) conducted in March and April of 2008. A wide range of VOCs were measured by a two-channel GC-MS (Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer) every 30 minutes significantly expanding the spatial and temporal database of these compounds in the Arctic spring-time marine boundary layer. This was done in order to (1) characterize the composition of VOCs over the ice-free regions of the Arctic and to (2) determine the relative impacts of local VOC sources (i.e. oceanic and local point sources) and sinks (i.e. halogen oxidation) in this isolated region. The VOC composition was dominated by relatively long-lived VOCs, such as ethane (median = 2.1 ppbv) and propane (median = 1.3 ppbv), and remained relatively constant throughout the far North Atlantic; however, there were distinct events that displayed significant variability in the measured mixing ratios of some VOCs. One episode is characterized by a 2-10 fold increase in C2-C6 alkanes indicating a primary source of anthropogenic emissions near the Kola Peninsula (Russia). In contrast, a significant decline in certain VOCs is associated with a halogen oxidation episode that occurred during an ozone depletion event (ODE). Halogen oxidation was further evidenced by sharp departures in the [benzene]/[acetylene] and [iso-butane]/[n-butane] ratios which are known to be affected by halogen chemistry.
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 16:45h
AN: A14A-04
TI: Shipboard measurement of ozone depletion events in the Arctic Ocean during ICEALOT 2008
AU: * Lerner, B M
EM: brian.lerner@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: * Lerner, B M
EM: brian.lerner@noaa.gov
AF: Chemical Sciences Division, Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Gilman, J B
EM: Jessica.Gilman@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Gilman, J B
EM: Jessica.Gilman@noaa.gov
AF: Chemical Sciences Division, Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Murphy, P C
EM: Paul.C.Murphy@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Murphy, P C
EM: Paul.C.Murphy@noaa.gov
AF: Chemical Sciences Division, Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Kuster, W C
EM: William.C.Kuster@noaa.gov
AF: Chemical Sciences Division, Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: DeGouw, J
EM: Joost.deGouw@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: DeGouw, J
EM: Joost.deGouw@noaa.gov
AF: Chemical Sciences Division, Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Johnson, J E
EM: James.E.Johnson@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Bates, T S
EM: Tim.Bates@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Williams, E J
EM: Eric.J.Williams@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Williams, E J
EM: Eric.J.Williams@noaa.gov
AF: Chemical Sciences Division, Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AB: During the International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic Lower Troposphere (ICEALOT) 2008, distinct ozone depletion events (ODEs) were observed aboard the R/V Knorr over a three-day period (April 15 to 17) near the Svalbard archipelago in the Arctic Ocean. Rapid changes in ozone mixing ratio were observed (up to 20 ppbv/hr) and absolute mixing ratios as low as 1 ppbv were measured. These ODEs were only observed in the northernmost (>77 °N) and coldest (<-10 °C) areas. Comparison to measurements of long-lived atmospheric compounds (e.g. carbon monoxide) gives evidence to transport versus in-place chemical production of the ODEs. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and photolysis rate measurements made during the cruise provide a means to estimate concentrations of the atmospheric oxidants hydroxyl radical (OH), atomic chlorine (Cl) and atomic bromine (Br). Coincident to the largest ODE, a significant (>10 nM) concentration of oceanic dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was observed. The effect of the estimated oxidant mixing ratios on DMS atmospheric lifetime will be discussed.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0312 Air/sea constituent fluxes (3339, 4504)
DE: 0321 Cloud/radiation interaction
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 1340h
AN: A43C-0313
TI: A Community Data Assimilation Facility for Confronting Climate GCMs with Observations
AU: Anderson, J
EM: jla@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000, United States
AU: * Raeder, K
EM: raeder@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000, United States
AU: Hoar, T
EM: thoar@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000, United States
AU: Collins, N
EM: nancy@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000, United States
AU: Liu, H
EM: hliu@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000, United States
AU: Arellano, A
EM: arellano@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000, United States
AB: The Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) is a community ensemble data assimilation facility developed by the Data Assimilation Research Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. DART can assimilate all the in situ observations routinely used for operational numerical weather prediction by centers like the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). DART can also assimilate a variety of remote sensing observations like GPS radio occultation, satellite cloud motion winds and scatterometer surface winds. DART is routinely used with both regional and global atmospheric models including NCAR's Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) and the AM2 model from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Confronting climate models like CAM and AM2 with observations in NWP mode can assess the relative quality of model dynamics and parameterizations and identify model errors. DART provides a variety of diagnostic tools that compare analyses and forecasts to observations. The ensemble analyses produced by DART facilitate sensitivity analysis that can give insight into the model dynamics and can help to tune physical parameterizations. DART also allows climate modelers to assimilate special observations from field programs or novel instruments that are not used in operational NWP analyses. It is straightforward to add new tracers and observations to DART models. For instance, DART/CAM was modified to support the recent ARCTAS field experiment by including carbon monoxide as a tracer and assimilating observations from the MOPITT instrument on NASA's EOS Terra satellite.
UR: http://www.image.ucar.edu/DAReS/DART/
DE: 3315 Data assimilation
DE: 3337 Global climate models (1626, 4928)
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 15:10h
AN: A13E-07
TI: Submicron Organic Aerosol Function Groups during the International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic LOwer Troposphere (ICEALOT)
AU: * Russell, L M
EM: lmrussell@ucsd.edu
AF: Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD 9500 Gilman Dr Mail Code 0221, La Jolla, CA 92093-0221, United States
AU: Shaw, P M
EM: pmshaw@ucsd.edu
AF: Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD 9500 Gilman Dr Mail Code 0221, La Jolla, CA 92093-0221, United States
AU: Quinn, P K
EM: patricia.k.quinn@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA PMEL, 9600 Sand Point Way, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Bates, T S
EM: Tim.bates@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA PMEL, 9600 Sand Point Way, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AB: Aerosol organic mass (OM) components are expected to have significant direct and indirect impacts on Arctic climate, especially during springtime Arctic haze. The chemical and physical properties of OM in Arctic aerosol remain largely unconstrained. The R/V Knorr traveled between Iceland and the Barents Sea during the ice-free months of March and April of 2008 and collected submicron particles on teflon filters for Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to identify and quantify organic functional groups. Time series and composition are presented along with air mass back trajectories to indicate source regions. Early findings identify alcohols, alkanes, and carboxylic acids, with smaller amounts of amines, aromatics, alkenes and carbonyls. These data show the important contributions of organic oxygen and nitrogen in the Arctic region. Single particle analysis by Near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) Scanning Transmission X- ray Microscopy (STXM) provides additional information about the distribution and morphology of the types of organic particles. Comparison to collocated simultaneous measurements by other techniques showed good agreement for OM and oxygenated organic fractions.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 14:25h
AN: A23F-04
TI: Synchronicity of Aerosol Optical Measurements acquired at Arctic and sub-Arctic sites
AU: * O'Neill, N T
EM: norm.oneill@USherbrooke.ca
AF: CARTEL, Universite de Sherbrooke, 2500 Boul. de l'Universite, Sherbrooke, PQ J1K2R1, Canada
AU: Saha, A
AF: CARTEL, Universite de Sherbrooke, 2500 Boul. de l'Universite, Sherbrooke, PQ J1K2R1, Canada
AU: Stone, R
EM: Robert.Stone@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA/CMDL, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305-3337, United States
AU: Abboud, I
EM: Ihab.Abboud@ec.gc.ca
AF: Environment Canada, Experimental Studies Division ARQX, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, ON M3H 5T4, Canada
AU: McArthur, B
EM: Bruce.McArthur@ec.gc.ca
AF: Environment Canada, Experimental Studies Division ARQX, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, ON M3H 5T4, Canada
AU: Freemantle, J
EM: james.freemantle@rogers.com
AF: CARTEL, Universite de Sherbrooke, 2500 Boul. de l'Universite, Sherbrooke, PQ J1K2R1, Canada
AU: Baibakov, K
EM: k.baibakov@usherbrooke.ca
AF: CARTEL, Universite de Sherbrooke, 2500 Boul. de l'Universite, Sherbrooke, PQ J1K2R1, Canada
AB: The ARCTAS (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites) campaign during the spring of 2008 provided a unique opportunity to compare and interpret a variety of airborne, groundbased and satellite aerosol measurments. In this communication we focus on the Arctic-wide interpretation of sunphotometry measurements acquired at a variety of Arctic and sub-Arctic sites and their link with available lidar and satellite data. The presentation will focus on sites in Barrow, Alaska (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory), the PEARL (Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory) Arctic observatory in Eureka, Nunavut (Canada) and AEROCAN / AERONET sites in Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories (Canada), and Iquluit, Nunavut. Emphasis will be placed on the synchronicity and propagation of extensive and intensive aerosol properties.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 4801 Aerosols (0305, 4906)
DE: 4906 Aerosols (0305, 4801)
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0094
TI: Daily Ozonesonde Launches at Barrow, Alaska During ARCTAS: April 1-21, 2008.
AU: * Johnson, B J
EM: bryan.johnson@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, R/GMD1, Boulder, CO 80305-3337, United States
AU: Oltmans, S
EM: Samuel.J.Oltmans@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway, R/GMD1, Boulder, CO 80305-3337, United States
AU: Simpson, W R
EM: ffwrs@uaf.edu
AF: Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, 903 Koyukuk Drive, Fairbanks, AK 99775, United States
AU: Donohoue, D L
EM: ddonohoue@gi.alaska.edu
AF: Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, 903 Koyukuk Drive, Fairbanks, AK 99775, United States
AB: Daily ozonesondes were launched from the NOAA/ESRL Barrow Observatory (71.32N, 156.6W) from April 1- 21, 2008 during the ARCTAS spring campaign (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites). Barrow was one of 13 sites in Canada and the U.S. launching daily ozonesondes (http://croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/arcions/) to look at springtime polar transport, tropospheric ozone budgets, and provide comparisons with the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) satellite overpasses. Total column ozone from the ozonesondes were 3.9 +/- 3.5% higher than the Barrow Dobson spectrophotometer. Prelaunch surface checks showed the ozonesonde to be consistently within +/- 0.6 ppbv of the Barrow surface Thermo Environmental Instruments (TEI) ozone monitor. The daily Barrow ozonesonde launches also provided a look at the vertical extent of an Arctic springtime surface ozone depletion event. These events are believed to be due to the springtime increase of natural halogen compounds, such as bromine and chlorine that react with ozone. The ozonesondes and the surface ozone measurements at Barrow Observatory showed one event when surface ozone dropped and remained at 3-6 ppbv for 2 days from April 15 to April 17. The low ozone extended from the surface to 210-260 meters altitude where ozone increased abruptly to 40-50 ppbv. The Chukchi Sea in the Arctic Ocean surrounds Barrow Observatory to the west, north, and east, with level tundra or permafrost to the south. However, the very low ozone was measured while the wind was coming from a relatively narrow west/northwest direction.
DE: 0340 Middle atmosphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
DE: 3307 Boundary layer processes
DE: 9315 Arctic region (0718, 4207)
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A21A-0105
TI: Investigation of the Los Angeles Basin Atmospheric Sulfur Budget
AU: * Spencer, K M
EM: kspencer@caltech.edu
AF: California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125, United States
AU: Crounse, J D
EM:
AF: California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125, United States
AU: St. Clair, J M
EM:
AF: California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125, United States
AU: Stickel, R E
EM:
AF: Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst St., Atlanta, GA 30332, United States
AU: Case Hanks, A T
EM:
AF: Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst St., Atlanta, GA 30332, United States
AU: Huey, L G
EM:
AF: Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst St., Atlanta, GA 30332, United States
AU: Cubison, M J
EM:
AF: University of Colorado at Boulder, 215 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Jimenez, J L
EM:
AF: University of Colorado at Boulder, 215 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Scheuer, E
EM:
AF: University of New Hampshire, 39 College Rd., Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Dibb, J E
EM:
AF: University of New Hampshire, 39 College Rd., Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Sachse, G W
EM:
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, 21 Langley Blvd., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Diskin, G S
EM:
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, 21 Langley Blvd., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Vay, S A
EM:
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, 21 Langley Blvd., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Wennberg, P O
EM:
AF: California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125, United States
AB: Airborne sulfur, as gas phase SO2 and particle phase SO42-, was measured in Southern California by in situ instruments aboard the NASA DC-8 during the summer 2007 TC4 and summer 2008 ARCTAS/CARB missions. Two chemical ionization mass spectrometers with differing ionization methods provided independent measurements of SO2. High-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry and a mist chamber / ion chromatography system provided independent measurements of SO42-. Ion chromatography was used to measure SO42- in aqueous extracts of bulk aerosol samples. Observed sulfur concentrations are considerably greater than those predicted from known sulfur sources. We investigate previously underrepresented sulfur sources from ship and aircraft emissions.
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0088
TI: The Influence of Distant Fires on the Chemical Properties of Arctic Aerosol During the Spring of 2008
AU: * Middlebrook, A M
EM: Ann.M.Middlebrook@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Bahreini, R
EM: Roya.Bahreini@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Bahreini, R
EM: Roya.Bahreini@noaa.gov
AF: University of Colorado, CIRES, Campus Box 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Brioude, J
EM: Jerome.Brioude@noaa.gov
AF: University of Colorado, CIRES, Campus Box 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Brioude, J
EM: Jerome.Brioude@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Brock, C A
EM: Charles.A.Brock@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Cozic, J A
EM: Julie.Cozic@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Cozic, J A
EM: Julie.Cozic@noaa.gov
AF: University of Colorado, CIRES, Campus Box 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: de Gouw, J A
EM: Joost.deGouw@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: de Gouw, J A
EM: Joost.deGouw@noaa.gov
AF: University of Colorado, CIRES, Campus Box 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Froyd, K D
EM: Karl.Froyd@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Froyd, K D
EM: Karl.Froyd@noaa.gov
AF: University of Colorado, CIRES, Campus Box 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Holloway, J S
EM: John.S.Holloway
AF: University of Colorado, CIRES, Campus Box 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Holloway, J S
EM: John.S.Holloway
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Lack, D A
EM: Daniel.Lack@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Lack, D A
EM: Daniel.Lack@noaa.gov
AF: University of Colorado, CIRES, Campus Box 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Lance, S M
EM: Sara.M.Lance@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Lance, S M
EM: Sara.M.Lance@noaa.gov
AF: University of Colorado, CIRES, Campus Box 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Murphy, D M
EM: Daniel.M.Murphy@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Ryerson, T B
EM: Thomas.B.Ryerson@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Schwarz, J P
EM: Joshua.P.Schwarz@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Schwarz, J P
EM: Joshua.P.Schwarz@noaa.gov
AF: University of Colorado, CIRES, Campus Box 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Spackman, J R
EM: Ryan.Spackman@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Spackman, J R
EM: Ryan.Spackman@noaa.gov
AF: University of Colorado, CIRES, Campus Box 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Thomson, D S
EM: dthomson@originalcode.com
AF: Droplet Measurement Technologies, 5710 Flatiron Parkway #B, Boulder, CO 80301, United States
AU: Thornberry, T D
EM: Troy.Thornberry@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Thornberry, T D
EM: Troy.Thornberry@noaa.gov
AF: University of Colorado, CIRES, Campus Box 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Veres, P
EM: Patrick.Veres@noaa.gov
AF: University of Colorado, CIRES, Campus Box 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Veres, P
EM: Patrick.Veres@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Warneke, C
EM: Carsten.Warneke@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL CSD, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Warneke, C
EM: Carsten.Warneke@noaa.gov
AF: University of Colorado, CIRES, Campus Box 216, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AB: Investigating Arctic aerosol chemical properties and sources was a primary component of the spring 2008 Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC) airborne field study above Alaska and the nearby Arctic Ocean. Size-resolved, non-refractory (NR) aerosol composition was measured on a 10-second basis and with high sensitivity aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft using an Aerodyne Compact Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (C-ToF AMS). Other onboard measurements included aerosol black carbon, single particle aerosol mass spectra, aerosol size distributions, and aerosol extinction as well as carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide, ozone, and volatile organic compounds. The aerosol chemical composition was highly variable as a function of altitude, in some cases within a few 100s of meters, with generally higher organic mass fractions at higher altitudes. Long-range transport of biomass burning pollutants (CO, acetonitrile, and aerosols) from large fires in the Lake Baikal (Russia) and Kazakhstan regions was observed at these altitudes and contributed to the highest measured aerosol concentrations during this study. The biomass burning organic material was highly oxidized, as measured by the m/z 44 to organic mass ratio. The peak at m/z 60, considered to be an AMS marker for biomass burning, was enhanced in these plumes along with the single particle biomass burning marker of potassium. Furthermore, these markers of biomass burning particles were observed when the sulfate mass fraction was higher and with lower aerosol mass concentrations. This indicates that biomass burning was an important source of the organic mass in background Arctic aerosol during the study period.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0322 Constituent sources and sinks
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 17:00h
AN: A14A-05
TI: Light absorption by aerosols in the European Arctic: First results from ICEALOT
AU: * Cappa, C D
EM: cdcappa@ucdavis.edu
AF: University of California, Davis, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616, United States
AU: Massoli, P
EM: paola.massoli@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Massoli, P
EM: paola.massoli@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA-ESRL, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Lack, D
EM: daniel.lack@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA-ESRL, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Lack, D
EM: daniel.lack@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Coffman, D
EM: derek.coffman@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA-PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Hamilton, D
EM: drew.hamilton@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA-PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Ehn, M
EM: mikael.ehn@helsinki.fi
AF: University of Helsinki, Division of Atmospheric Sciences PO Box 64, Helsinki, 00014, Finland
AU: Kroll, J
EM: kroll@aerodyne.com
AF: Aerodyne Research, Inc., 45 Manning Road, Billerica, MA 01821, United States
AU: Lerner, B
EM: brian.lerner@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA-ESRL, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Lerner, B
EM: brian.lerner@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Williams, E J
EM: eric.williams@noaa.gov
AF: CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Williams, E J
EM: eric.williams@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA-ESRL, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Burkhart, J F
EM: jfb@nilu.no
AF: Norweigan Institute for Air Research (NILU), PO Box 100, Kjeller, 2027, Norway
AU: Quinn, P K
EM: patricia.k.quinn@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA-PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Bates, T
EM: tim.bates@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA-PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AB: Measurements of light absorption by atmospheric aerosols in the Arctic marine boundary were made aboard the R/V Knorr during the springtime (March/April) ICEALOT campaign. The absorption measurements were made using a photoacoustic spectrometer operating at 532 nm and a particle soot absorption photometer operating at 467 nm, 530 nm and 660 nm. These measurements were made along with light extinction measurements at 532 nm to allow for accurate determination of the particle single scatter albedo, SSA. The absorption levels were < 0.5 Mm-1 for most of the campaign, with typical SSA values > 0.93. A few "plumes", originating from Eurasia, were encountered where the observed absorption was significantly higher than background (~ 2 Mm-1) and the SSA was lower, although the observed SSA varied between the different plumes despite the similar absorption levels. We will discuss the absolute absorption levels and the variability in the SSA observed throughout the campaign in terms of the concurrent physical and chemical properties of the aerosol, the aerosol age and the specific source region. We will combine these in situ measurements made in the marine boundary layer with clear sky optical depth measurements to make estimates of the local direct radiative forcing by the aerosol, with a special focus on measurements made near the sea-ice edge in the Greenland Sea.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0360 Radiation: transmission and scattering
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0085
TI: CCN Measurements of Forest Fire Plumes Aboard the NASA DC-8 and P3-B Aircraft Platforms During ARCTAS
AU: * Lathem, T L
EM: terry.lathem@gmail.com
AF: Earth and Atmospheric Science, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332,
AU: Nenes, A
EM: nenes@eas.gatech.edu
AF: Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332,
AU: Nenes, A
EM: nenes@eas.gatech.edu
AF: Earth and Atmospheric Science, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332,
AU: Anderson, B E
EM: Bruce.E.Anderson@nasa.gov
AF: NASA, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681,
AU: Chen, G
EM: gao.chen@nasa.gov
AF: NASA, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681,
AU: Dibb, J
EM: jack.dibb@unh.edu
AF: Institute for the Study of Earth, Ocean, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824,
AU: Scheuer, E
EM: eric.scheuer@unh.edu
AF: Institute for the Study of Earth, Ocean, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824,
AU: Thornhill, L
EM: kenneth.l.thornhill@nasa.gov
AF: Science Systems and Applications, Inc., SSAI, Hampton, VA 23666,
AU: Thornhill, L
EM: kenneth.l.thornhill@nasa.gov
AF: NASA, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681,
AU: Winstead, E
EM: Edward.L.Winstead@nasa.gov
AF: Science Systems and Applications, Inc., SSAI, Hampton, VA 23666,
AU: Winstead, E
EM: Edward.L.Winstead@nasa.gov
AF: NASA, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681,
AU: Beyersdorf, A
EM: Andreas.J.Beyersdorf@nasa.gov
AF: Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge University, Oak Ridge, TN 37831,
AU: Beyersdorf, A
EM: Andreas.J.Beyersdorf@nasa.gov
AF: NASA, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681,
AB: We present an overview of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) measurements for forest fire plumes sampled during the summer phase of the 2008 NASA Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) campaign. Measurements were obtained aboard the NASA DC-8 and P3-B platforms, with the primary focus of studying the characteristics and ageing of the biomass forest fire plumes present over Alberta, Canada during July, 2008. The DC-8 flew eight flights and the P3-B flew nine flights out of Cold Lake in Alberta, Canada, which included in-situ samples from fresh and aged biomass burning plumes, sampling of plumes from different stages of development, plume profiling and evolution, and interactions between smoke and cloud. We present the CCN number concentration and growth kinetics in the various biomass plumes as compared to the background conditions and will discuss the changes in growth kinetics in response to plume ageing. We will also explore the differences in CCN and growth kinetics encountered between flaming and smoldering fire plumes near the source. The comprehensive nature of the sampling and the large number of plumes encountered makes this a valuable data set for constraining uncertainties associated with prediction of CCN concentration and cloud droplet number for clouds influenced by biomass burning. These investigations related to CCN closure will have the underlying focus on improving aerosol-cloud parameterizations.
DE: 3311 Clouds and aerosols
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 14:55h
AN: A13E-06
TI: Volatility-resolved Measurements of the Chemical Composition of Arctic Aerosol Particles
AU: * Ehn, M
EM: mikael.ehn@helsinki.fi
AF: Division of Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hallstromin katu 2, Helsinki, 00560, Finland
AU: Kroll, J
EM: kroll@aerodyne.com
AF: Aerodyne Research Inc., 45 Manning Road, Billerica, MA 91821, United States
AU: Coffman, D
EM: derek.coffman@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Quinn, P
EM: patricia.k.quinn@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Bates, T
EM: tim.bates@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Williams, E
EM: eric.j.williams@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, Finland
AU: Kulmala, M
EM: markku.kulmala@helsinki.fi
AF: Division of Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hallstromin katu 2, Helsinki, 00560, Finland
AU: Worsnop, D
EM: worsnop@aerodyne.com
AF: Aerodyne Research Inc., 45 Manning Road, Billerica, MA 91821, United States
AB: Here we describe measurements of the chemical composition of submicron particles in the Arctic marine boundary layer, taken on board the R/V Knorr during the IPY-ICEALOT mission (March-April 2008). Measurements were made with an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) for the measurement of the non-refractory fraction of the aerosol, in particular allowing for the determination of the oxygen/carbon (O/C) ratio of the particulate organics and the unambiguous identification of trace inorganic species. Sampling alternated between ambient air and air sent through a thermodenuder (TD), continually scanned between 50 and 250C in order to remove aerosol components by volatility. The mass spectra of particulate matter in the Arctic (including Arctic haze) were dominated by sulfur-containing peaks and the CO2+ ion (at m/z 44), indicating the main non-refractory components of the aerosol are acidic sulfate and highly oxygenated organics. Thermodenuder measurements allow for the clear speciation of sulfate compounds by volatility, as well as the comparison of the degree of atmospheric aging of the organics to measurements taken elsewhere (including at terrestrial sites). AMS measurements will be compared to results from a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA), also downstream of the thermodenuder, as well as from semicontinuous (PILS) and offline (filter) measurements of particle composition.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11E-0191
TI: Cloud radiative properties derived from the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) during recent airborne field campaigns
AU: * Kindel, B C
EM: kindel@lasp.colorado.edu
AF: LASP and the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado, Campus Box 392, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Schmidt, S
EM: schmise@uni-mainz.de
AF: Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Mainz, Becherweg 21, Mainz, 55099, Germany
AU: Pilewskie, P
EM: peter.pilewskie@lasp.colorado.edu
AF: LASP and the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado, Campus Box 392, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Platnick, S
EM: steven.platnick@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 613.2, Greenbelt, MD 20771, United States
AU: Wind, G
EM: gala.wind@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 613.2, Greenbelt, MD 20771, United States
AU: Kokhanovsky, A
EM: alexk@iup.physik.uni-bremen.de
AF: Institute of Environmental Physics, University of Bremen, Postfach 33 04 40, Bremen, 28359, Germany
AB: The Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) has flown on several airborne campaigns in the last few years (e.g. PACDEX, TC4, ARCTAS). From the measurement of spectral irradiance, cloud optical properties are derived including: optical depth, spectral albedo, flux divergence (cloud absorption) and particle effective radius. Most of these important parameters for radiative budget studies are derived from satellite radiance measurements (e.g. MODIS), others such as flux divergence are not. Aircraft spectral irradiance measurements offers the possibility to validate satellite retrievals and to examine the relationship between radiance measurements (made by satellites) to those of irradiance, the fundamental quantity of the radiative energy budget. We test the ability of radiative transfer models (both 1 and 3-D) and asymptotic theory to recreate spectral cloud albedo measurements from radiance measurements. Finally, spectral flux divergence, is compared to model calculations for both low level liquid water clouds and for high level ice clouds. The possible influence of aerosols on cloud radiative properties is highlighted.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0319 Cloud optics
DE: 0321 Cloud/radiation interaction
DE: 0360 Radiation: transmission and scattering
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 12:04h
AN: A42B-07
TI: Observations of ClNO2, N2O5, and Cl2 off the Northeastern United States Coast
AU: * Kercher, J P
EM: kercher@atmos.washington.edu
AF: Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, United States
AU: Thornton, J A
EM: thornton@washington.edu
AF: Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, United States
AU: Lerner, B
EM: Brian.Lerner@noaa.gov
AF: Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Williams, E J
EM: Eric.J.Williams@noaa.gov
AF: Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Quinn, P
EM: Patricia.K.Quinn@noaa.gov
AF: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Sandpoint Way, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Bates, T
EM: Tim.Bates@noaa.gov
AF: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Sandpoint Way, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Coffman, D
EM: Derek.Coffman@noaa.gov
AF: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Sandpoint Way, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Dube, W P
EM: William.P.Dube
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Evironmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Dube, W P
EM: William.P.Dube
AF: Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Fuchs, H
EM: Hendrik.Fuchs@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Evironmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Fuchs, H
EM: Hendrik.Fuchs@noaa.gov
AF: Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Brown, S S
EM: Steven.S.Brown@noaa.gov
AF: Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AB: As part of the International Chemistry Experiment of the Arctic Lower Troposphere (ICEALOT), the University of Washington chemical ionization mass spectrometer (UW-CIMS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration cavity ringdown spectrometer (NOAA-CRDs) were deployed aboard the Research Vessel, Knorr, to simultaneously measure nitryl chloride (ClNO2), Cl2 and N2O5 in ambient air. Nighttime mixing ratios of nitryl chloride and N2O5 were routinely between 150 and 500 ppt in the Rhode Island, Nantucket and Long Island Sounds over a 6 day period from March 18th to March 23rd. A maximum value of 1.4 ppb of ClNO2 was recorded on March 20th, and significant daytime mixing ratios (50 ppt) of ClNO2 were observed throughout the afternoon of March 19th due to significant cloud cover and thus low actinic flux at the surface. Throughout this period, Cl2 was not observed above the UW- CIMS detection limit, conservatively estimated to be less than 20 ppt, suggesting that ClNO2 is the dominant chlorine radical source in these regions during late winter - early spring. Our measurements are used along with observations of NOx, O3, aerosol composition, and calculations of air mass trajectories to assess the ClNO2 production rates required to explain the observations. This analysis provides the first experimental determination of the efficiency of halogen activation by nitrogen oxides in the winter season.
DE: 3307 Boundary layer processes
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0082
TI: Hygroscopic Properties of Aerosol Particles in the Arctic
AU: Worsnop, D
EM: worsnop@aerodyne.com
AF: Aerodyne Research Inc., 45 Manning Road, Billerica, MA 91821, United States
AU: * Ehn, M
EM: mikael.ehn@helsinki.fi
AF: Division of Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hallstromin katu 2, Helsinki, 00560, Finland
AU: Kroll, J
EM: kroll@aerodyne.com
AF: Aerodyne Research Inc., 45 Manning Road, Billerica, MA 91821, United States
AU: Massoli, P
EM: paola.massoli@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Quinn, P
EM: patricia.k.quinn@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Bates, T
EM: tim.bates@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Cappa, C
EM: cdcappa@ucdavis.edu
AF: Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616,
AU: Williams, E
EM: eric.j.williams@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory, 325 Broadway R/CSD7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Coffman, D
EM: derek.coffman@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Kulmala, M
EM: markku.kulmala@helsinki.fi
AF: Division of Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hallstromin katu 2, Helsinki, 00560, Finland
AB: The hygroscopicity and volatility of aerosol particles in the Arctic were studied during the IPY-ICEALOT mission in March/April 2008 on board the R/V Knorr. A hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) measured behind a thermodenuder scanning the temperature range 50-250C, thereby acquiring hygroscopic growth factors as a function of volatilization temperature. Every second scan the sample flow bypassed the thermodenuder and we measured ambient air. The sizes investigated by the HTDMA were 50, 100 and 150 nm, providing information of both Aitken and accumulation mode aerosol. On average during the cruise, the hygroscopic growth factors resembled those of ammonium sulfate. This is in line with data from a high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) which also sampled behind the thermodenuder, showing that the submicron aerosol was dominated by sulfate and oxygenated organics. The hygroscopic properties of the particles directly influence their size and therefore their radiative properties, and additionally determine the size at which a particle will activate and form a cloud droplet, contributing to the indirect cooling effect of the aerosol particles. A more detailed analysis will be performed, including case studies of continental outflow and comparisons with the HR-AMS and other chemical and physical measurements conducted on the ship.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 1340h
AN: A23A-0272 [WITHDRAWN]
TI: Preliminary aerosol parameter retrieval from ARCTAS-II using merged RSP and HSRL data
AU: * Knobelspiesse, K
EM: kdk2103@columbia.edu
AF: Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, 2880 Broadway, Room 668, New York, NY 10025, United States
AU: Cairns, B
EM: bcairns@giss.nasa.gov
AF: NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025, United States
AU: Ottaviani, M
EM: catullovr@hotmail.com
AF: NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025, United States
AU: Hostetler, C
EM: chris.a.hostetler@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, NASA LaRC, 100 NASA Road, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Ferrare, R
EM: richard.a.ferrare@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, NASA LaRC, 100 NASA Road, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Rogers, R
EM: raymond.r.rogers@nasa.gov
AF: Science Systems and Applications, Inc. and NASA LaRC, One Enterprise Pkwy, Hampton, VA 23669, United States
AU: Obland, M
EM: michael.d.obland@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, NASA LaRC, 100 NASA Road, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Hair, J
EM: Johnathan.W.Hair@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, NASA LaRC, 100 NASA Road, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Clarke, A
EM: tclarke@soest.hawaii.edu
AF: Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, United States
AU: McNaughton, C
EM: Cameronm@soest.hawaii.edu
AF: Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, United States
AB: The second phase of the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) field campaign concluded on July 13, 2008 for the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) and High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) instruments onboard the NASA King Air B-200 aircraft. A total of 21 research or transit flights were conducted over a twenty day period from the base of operations in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. Smoke aerosols were observed from boreal fires located over western Canada and eastern Siberia. This is an ideal data set to test the ability of the RSP to retrieve optical parameters of absorbing aerosols from forest fires, as the B-200 flew many coordinated flights with NASA's P- 3b and DC-8 aircraft that measured aerosol properties in situ. Previously, retrieval of absorbing aerosol parameters with the RSP has been difficult unless a priori constraints are placed on aerosol layer heights. During ARCTAS, HSRL provided layer height constraints for RSP aerosol parameter retrievals. These results were compared to retrievals without layer height constraints and the in situ measurements. Polarimeter-Lidar data merger such as this has implications for orbital instruments as well, since the RSP is the airborne prototype of the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS). APS is part of the NASA Glory satellite, due to be launched in 2009 into the "A-train" orbit, which also contains the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) instrument.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0360 Radiation: transmission and scattering
DE: 0394 Instruments and techniques
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A51C-0116
TI: Observations of Chlorine Activation by N2O5 in the North Atlantic Marine Boundary Layer: The Roles of Continental Outflow and Ship Emissions
AU: * Thornton, J A
EM: thornton@atmos.washington.edu
AF: Department of Atmospheric Sciences, 408 ATG Building University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195,
AU: Kercher, J P
EM: kercher@atmos.washington.edu
AF: Department of Atmospheric Sciences, 408 ATG Building University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195,
AU: Lerner, B
EM: Brian.Lerner@noaa.gov
AF: Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305,
AU: Williams, E
EM: Eric.J.Williams@noaa.gov
AF: Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305,
AU: Quinn, P K
EM: Patricia.K.Quinn@noaa.gov
AF: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Sandpoint Way, Seattle, WA 98115,
AU: Bates, T
EM: Tim.Bates@noaa.gov
AF: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Sandpoint Way, Seattle, WA 98115,
AU: Coffman, D
EM: Derek.Coffman@noaa.gov
AF: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Sandpoint Way, Seattle, WA 98115,
AU: Dube, W P
EM: William.P.Dube@noaa.gov
AF: 3Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309,
AU: Dube, W P
EM: William.P.Dube@noaa.gov
AF: Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305,
AU: Fuchs, H
EM: Hendrik.Fuchs@noaa.gov
AF: 3Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309,
AU: Fuchs, H
EM: Hendrik.Fuchs@noaa.gov
AF: Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305,
AU: Brown, S S
EM: Steven.S.Brown@noaa.gov
AF: Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305,
AB: We describe the first simultaneous observations of nitryl chloride (ClNO2) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) made in the open North Atlantic Ocean during the International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic Lower Troposphere (ICEALOT) campaign that occurred March 22-April 24, 2008 aboard the Research Vessel Knorr. N2O5 and ClNO2 mixing ratios, measured by the University of Washington chemical ionization mass spectrometer (UW-CIMS), ranged from below the detection limit to as high as 200 pptv and 600 pptv, respectively, along a transect from the Nantucket Sound to Tromsø, Norway. The highest mixing ratios along this transect were measured closest to the U.S. coast, but we observed several individual events when both N2O5 and ClNO2 ranged from 5 to 100 pptv far from major continental NOx sources. We attribute these particular events to the sampling of ship plumes. We compare UW-CIMS N2O5 concentrations during these events to those measured by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory's cavity ring-down spectrometer for additional support when concentrations are low. With this added confidence in N2O5 abundance, we use contemporaneous measurements of NOx, NOy, O3, CO, SO2, and sub and super micron aerosol composition to compare and contrast the efficiency of chlorine activation by NOx in continental outflow and open-ocean ship plumes.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0317 Chemical kinetic and photochemical properties
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0095
TI: Aerosol properties derived from spectral actinic flux measurements
AU: * Stark, H
EM: harald.stark@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: * Stark, H
EM: harald.stark@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division, 325 Broadway R/CSD 7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Schmidt, K S
EM: sebastian.schmidt@lasp.colorado.edu
AF: University of Colorado at Boulder, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Pilewskie, P
EM: Peter.Pilewskie@lasp.colorado.edu
AF: University of Colorado at Boulder, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Cozic, J
EM: Julie.Cozic@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Cozic, J
EM: Julie.Cozic@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division, 325 Broadway R/CSD 7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Wollny, A G
EM: awollny@mpch-mainz.mpg.de
AF: Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Biogeochemistry Department J.-J.-Becher-Weg 27, Mainz, 55128, Germany
AU: Brock, C A
EM: Charles.A.Brock@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Baynard, T
EM: tahllee.baynard@lmco.com
AF: Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies, 135 South Taylor Avenue, Louisville, CO 80027, United States
AU: Lack, D
EM: Daniel.Lack@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Lack, D
EM: Daniel.Lack@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division, 325 Broadway R/CSD 7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Parrish, D D
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Fehsenfeld, F C
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Fehsenfeld, F C
AF: NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division, 325 Broadway R/CSD 7, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AB: Measurement of aerosol properties is very important for understanding climate change. Aerosol optical properties influence solar radiation throughout the troposphere. According to the Working Group I report of the intergovernmental panel for climate change [IPCC, 2007], aerosols have a direct radiative forcing of - 0.5±0.4 W/m2 with a medium to low level of scientific understanding. This relatively large uncertainty indicates the need for more frequent and precise measurements of aerosol properties. We will show how actinic flux measurements can be used to derive important optical aerosol parameters such as aerosol optical thickness and depth, surface albedo, angstrom exponent, radiative forcing by clouds and aerosols, aerosol extinction, and others. The instrument used for this study is a combination of two spectroradiometers measuring actinic flux in the ultraviolet and visible radiation range from 280 to 690 nm with a resolution of 1 nm. Actinic flux is measured as the radiation incident on a spherical surface with sensitivity independent of direction. In contrast, irradiance is measured as the radiation incident on a plane surface, which depends on the cosine of the incident angle. Our goal is to assess the capabilities of using spectral actinic flux measurements to derive various aerosol properties. Here we will compare 1) actinic flux measurements to irradiance measurements from the spectral solar flux radiometer (SSFR), 2) derived aerosol size distributions with measurements from a white light optical particle counter (WLOPC) and ultra high sensitivity aerosol size spectrometer (UHSAS), and 3) derived aerosol optical extinction with measurements from a cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectrometer (CRD-AES). These comparisons will utilize data from three recent field campaigns over New England and the Atlantic Ocean (ICARTT 2004), Texas and the Gulf of Mexico during (TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006), and Alaska and the Arctic Ocean (ARCPAC 2008) when the instruments were installed on board the NOAA WP-3D aircraft. IPCC (2007), Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0321 Cloud/radiation interaction
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0360 Radiation: transmission and scattering
DE: 0394 Instruments and techniques
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0080 [WITHDRAWN]
TI: Investigation of the Aerosols Over the Los Angeles Basin during the ARCTAS-CARB 2008 Pilot Study
AU: * Thornhill, L
EM: Kenneth.L.Thornhill@nasa.gov
AF: SSAI, 1 Enterprise Parkway, Suite 200, Hampton, VA 23666, United States
AU: Anderson, B E
EM: Bruce.E.Anderson@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Science Directorate 21 Langley Blvd, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Beyersdorf, A
EM: andreasjb@gmail.com
AF: Oak Ridge Associated Universities, 1299 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, United States
AU: Chen, G
EM: Gao.Chen@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Science Directorate 21 Langley Blvd, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Winstead, E L
EM: Edward.L.Winstead@nasa.gov
AF: SSAI, 1 Enterprise Parkway, Suite 200, Hampton, VA 23666, United States
AU: Lathem, T
EM: terry.lathem@gmail.com
AF: Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, United States
AU: Diskin, G
EM: Glenn.S.Diskin@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Science Directorate 21 Langley Blvd, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Sachse, G
EM: Glen.W.Sachse@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Science Directorate 21 Langley Blvd, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Dibb, J
EM: Jack.Dibb@unh.edu
AF: Inst for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Scheuer, E
EM: Eric.Scheuer@gmail.com
AF: Inst for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, United States
AB: In the summer of 2008 during preparation for the second phase of the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS), detailed measurements of atmospheric composition were made on-board the NASA DC-8 over the state of California on behalf of the California Air resources Board (CARB). Four flights were conducted between 18 July and 24 July, totaling 31 hours, over southern and central California to establish upwind chemical boundary conditions and gain a better understanding of the sources, chemical characteristics and spatial distribution of smog and greenhouse gases over the state. Serendipitously, from a science perspective, this time period was marked by numerous wildfires spread throughout the state. The DC-8 sensor suite included aerosol instruments capable of measuring the number concentrations, optical properties, and size distributions of aerosols between 0.003 and 20 um in diameter. In this presentation, we will characterize aerosols sampled during sorties over the Los Angeles basin, which included several missed approaches at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), traverses through the Long Beach and Santa Barbara ship channels, sampling in and out of the marine boundary layer, and encounters with outflow of forest fires mixed with urban smog. We will examine the evolution of the aerosols over the course of the day, as the smog accumulates within the basin and is then transported out of the basin into the surrounding atmosphere.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0325 Evolution of the atmosphere (1610, 8125)
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 11:05h
AN: A12A-04
TI: On the Use of Boundary Layer NO2 Observations From an Airborne Platform for Satellite Validation
AU: * Perring, A E
EM: aperring@berkeley.edu
AF: University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemistry 419 Latimer Hall, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94702, United States
AU: Russell, A R
EM: arrussell@berkeley.edu
AF: University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemistry 419 Latimer Hall, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94702, United States
AU: Valin, L C
EM: lukevalin@berkeley.edu
AF: University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemistry 419 Latimer Hall, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94702, United States
AU: Bertram, T H
EM: tbertram@atmos.washington.edy
AF: University of Washington, Department of Atmospheric Sciences 408 ATG Building, Box 351640, Seattle, WA 98195, United States
AU: Wooldridge, P J
EM: pjwool@berkeley.edu
AF: University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemistry 419 Latimer Hall, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94702, United States
AU: Cohen, R C
EM: cohen@cchem.berkeley.edu
AF: University of California, Berkeley, Department of Earth and Planetary Science 307 McCone Hall, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States
AU: Cohen, R C
EM: cohen@cchem.berkeley.edu
AF: University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemistry 419 Latimer Hall, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94702, United States
AB: Tropospheric NO2 columns have been measured from space since the mid 1990s. The OMI instrument has been achieving global coverage daily since 2005, providing an incredible resource for addressing long- standing issues concerning global NOx emissions, chemistry and transport. Accurate retrievals are highly dependent on the use of correct a priori vertical distributions of NOx. Comparison of retrieved column densities with in situ aircraft data provides a direct method for evaluating the quality of satellite observations. Extensive use has been made of NO2 data collected by UC Berkeley aboard the NASA DC-8 during four different campaigns between 2005 and 2008 (Boersma, et al, 2008, Bucsela et al, 2008) but has thus far been limited to ascents and descents that span from the boundary layer to near the tropopause to minimize the need for extrapolation. The vast majority of the NO2 tropospheric column, however, is confined to the planetary boundary layer such that a reasonably accurate integrated column can be inferred from a boundary layer height and concentration alone. Here we describe the use of all boundary layer observations from the PAVE, INTEX-B, TC4 and ARCTAS campaigns to calculate integrated tropospheric NO2 columns for comparison to coincident satellite observations. The observations range from the equator to the North Pole between 175 and 289 degrees longitude and include winter, spring and summer measurements. This analysis greatly increases the number of available validation opportunities and allows us to investigate the influence of a variety of factors on retrieved column densities. An assessment of the accuracy of OMI retrievals based on this comparison is reported.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0394 Instruments and techniques
DE: 1640 Remote sensing (1855)
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0091
TI: Study of Interannual Variability of Boreal Biomass Emission Using MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Retrievals
AU: * Chu, D
EM: allen.chu@nasa.gov
AF: GEST, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, United States
AU: Johnson, A
EM: ajohns14@valpo.edu
AF: Department of Meteorology, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN 46383, United States
AB: During ARCTAS (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites) field experiments of spring and summer phases, boreal biomass burning played an important role in the long- range transported aerosols to the Arctic. The effects are significant in aradiative forcing caused by the light- absorbing soot particles as models had indicated. To understand the transport, however, we need first to locate the source regions. Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrievals from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors on NASA's Terra and Aqua Satellites were used to identify source areas of significant boreal biomass burning emissions at north of 50° latitude circle. With a set of time series of daily mean AOD constructed for all source areas of 5° x 5° grids, interannual variability is analyzed from March 2000 through August 2008 The correlation of number of high smoke activity events per month with satellite/model-derived carbon emissions show a maximum value (0.8-0.9) as AOD is greater than 0.4 in both Eurasia and North America. However there appears to be no correlation between these two regions, which indicates the complexity of the causes of the biomass burning events. In studying the response to climate cycles, the time series of monthly AOD means are correlating with ENSO, PDO as well as several northern hemisphere teleconnection patterns (such as PNA, POL). In summary, it can be concluded that (1) MODIS AOD retrievals adequately characterize boreal forest biomass-burning emissions, and (2) North American seasonal fire activity is closely associated with positive ENSO phase whereas Eurasia fire activity is more related to the negative ENSO phase of the previous winter months, and (3) PDO and other teleconnection patterns appear to play a modulating role in the fire activities of boreal biomass burning.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0480 Remote sensing
DE: 3305 Climate change and variability (1616, 1635, 3309, 4215, 4513)
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0083
TI: The dependence of aerosol light extinction on relative humidity during the spring 2008 ICEALOT experiment in the European Arctic
AU: * Massoli, P
EM: paola.massoli@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: * Massoli, P
EM: paola.massoli@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Chemical Science Division, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Cappa, C D
EM: cdcappa@ucdavis.edu
AF: Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, United States
AU: Quinn, P K
EM: patricia.k.quinn@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AU: Kroll, J
EM: kroll@aerodyne.com
AF: Aerodyne Research, Inc., 45 Manning Road, Billerica, MA 01821, United States
AU: Burkhart, J
EM: jfb@nilu.no
AF: Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), P.O. Box 100, Kjeller, N-2027, Norway
AU: Ehn, M
EM: mikael.ehn@helsinki.fi
AF: University of Helsinki, Department of Physical Sciences, P.O. Box 64, Helsinki, 00014, Finland
AU: Williams, E
EM: eric.j.williams@noaa.gov
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Williams, E
EM: eric.j.williams@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Chemical Science Division, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Bates, T
EM: tim.bates@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, United States
AB: Aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Knorr in the European Arctic Ocean during the IPY- ICEALOT campaign (March - April 2008). This experiment was designed to give insights into the characteristics and sources of aerosols emitted within the Arctic or transported from mid-latitudes. One of the goals was the characterization of Arctic haze, a phenomenon that originates from the confinement of pollutants in the stable Arctic springtime boundary layer. The multi-wavelength cavity ring down spectrometer (CRD) provided measurement of both aerosol light extinction and its dependence on relative humidity here expressed as gamma. The CRD was coupled with the photo acoustic spectrometer to determine aerosol absorption and the single scattering albedo of the sampled aerosols. All the listed parameters are reported at 532 nm. In general, aerosol levels were rather low (< 10 Mm-1), and particles were highly hygroscopic (gamma > 0.9) and non-absorbing (albedo ~ 0.95). This study focuses on the aerosol hygroscopic properties from CRD during particular events and time periods. For instance, unusually high gamma values (up to 2.5) characterized the air masses sampled off the Kola Peninsula (71 N-19 E): such highly hygroscopic aerosols coincided generally with SO2 plumes, and at times were highly correlated with bursts of ultra-fine particles. We also present the characteristics of the aerosols under conditions of Arctic haze, i.e., slightly absorbing and less hygroscopic air masses (gamma between 0.85 and 1) compared to the emissions from the Kola Peninsula. Finally we report the emissions from fishing boats sampled in the vicinity of the Norwegian coast, and a pollution event from North Europe (as indicated by the Lagrangian model for particle diffusion and dispersion FLEXPART) during which we observed extinction up to 15 Mm-1, and slightly lower gamma and particle albedo values, indicating "fresher" air masses. These results are important for further understanding the characteristics of Arctic springtime aerosols and assessing their direct radiative effect for the overall forcing of a warming Arctic system.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 14:25h
AN: A13E-04
TI: Analysis of Aerosol Characteristics Measured in the Arctic Atmosphere during ARCTAS
AU: * Beyersdorf, A J
EM: andreas.j.beyersdorf@nasa.gov
AF: Oak Ridge Associated Universities, NASA Postdoctoral Program P.O. Box 117, MS 36, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, United States
AU: * Beyersdorf, A J
EM: andreas.j.beyersdorf@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Science Directorate 21 Langley Blvd., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Anderson, B E
EM: bruce.e.anderson@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Science Directorate 21 Langley Blvd., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Blake, D R
EM: drblake@uci.edu
AF: Department of Chemistry, University of California Irvine, 570 Rowland Hall, Irvine, CA 92697, United States
AU: Chen, G
EM: gao.chen@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Science Directorate 21 Langley Blvd., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Dibb, J E
EM: jack.dibb@unh.edu
AF: Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Morse Hall 8 College Road, Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Diskin, G S
EM: glenn.s.diskin@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Science Directorate 21 Langley Blvd., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Lathem, T
EM: terry.lathem@gmail.com
AF: Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332, United States
AU: Scheuer, E
EM: eric.scheuer@unh.edu
AF: Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Morse Hall 8 College Road, Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Thornhill, L
EM: kenneth.l.thornhill@nasa.gov
AF: Science Systems and Applications, Inc., 1 Enterprise Parkway, Suite 200, Hampton, VA 23666, United States
AU: Thornhill, L
EM: kenneth.l.thornhill@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Science Directorate 21 Langley Blvd., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Winstead, E L
EM: edward.l.winstead@nasa.gov
AF: Science Systems and Applications, Inc., 1 Enterprise Parkway, Suite 200, Hampton, VA 23666, United States
AU: Winstead, E L
EM: edward.l.winstead@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Science Directorate 21 Langley Blvd., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Vay, S A
EM: stephanie.a.vay@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, Science Directorate 21 Langley Blvd., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AB: In situ measurements of aerosols were made on board the NASA DC-8 as part of the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) campaign. A suite of aerosol instruments were installed on the DC-8 to measure the number concentrations, optical properties, and size distributions of aerosols and clouds. Flights were flown out of Fairbanks, Alaska during the spring of 2008 and out of Cold Lake, Canada during summer 2008. The spring flights measured instances of Arctic haze which result from the long range transport of pollution from mid-latitude source regions. We investigate the possible prevalence and radiative influence of ice clouds in these haze events. During the summer deployment, flights were flown to characterize emissions from Canadian forest fires. Both fresh and aged fire plumes were sampled in order to determine the impact of this source on the Arctic atmosphere. Aged Siberian and California forest fire plumes were also sampled. In this presentation, we document and contrast the microphysical and optical properties of aerosols from the different sources and examine how these properties change as a function of plume age and cloud processing.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0325 Evolution of the atmosphere (1610, 8125)
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 3311 Clouds and aerosols
DE: 9315 Arctic region (0718, 4207)
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 08:18h
AN: B41E-02
TI: Characterization of Vertical Transport of Fire Emissions over North America: Analysis of MISR Observations with a 1-D Plume-resolving Model
AU: * Val Martin, M
EM: mvalmart@seas.harvard.edu
AF: Harvard University, Pierce Hall 29 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138, United States
AU: Logan, J
EM: jlogan@seas.harvard.edu
AF: Harvard University, Pierce Hall 29 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138, United States
AU: Freitas, S
EM: saulo.freitas@cptec.inpe.br
AF: Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos (INPE), Rodovia Presidente Dutra, km 39, Cachoeira Paulista, SP 12630-000, Brazil
AU: Nelson, D
EM: David.L.Nelson@jpl.nasa.gov
AF: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109, United States
AU: Leung, F
EM: fokyan.leung@gmail.com
AF: Washington State University, Laboratory of Atmospheric Research, Pullman, WA 99164, United States
AU: Kahn, R
EM: Ralph.Kahn@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 613.2, Greenbelt, MD 20771, United States
AU: Diner, D
EM: djd@jord.jpl.nasa.gov
AF: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109, United States
AB: Wildfires regularly burn thousands of hectares in North America. Strong buoyancy associated with the fires can result in the injection of their emissions above the boundary layer. This may have important consequences for long-range transport of fire emissions and their effects on atmospheric composition at regional to hemispheric scales. Here we present a study of aerosol injection heights over North America using five years of stereo-height retrievals of wildfire plumes obtained from the NASA Terra Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). The analysis of observed MISR plume heights in combination with GEOS-4 meteorological data indicates that 5--45% of the plumes emit emissions above the boundary layer, depending on the fire characteristics and on the year. In addition, smoke that reaches the free troposphere tends to get confined within stable layers in the atmosphere, when they are present. A parameterization of injection heights of wildfire plumes over North America is developed using a 1-D plume-resolving model driven by ambient conditions and fire properties. Simulated heights of the plumes are evaluated at a local scale using injection heights observed by MISR. We show preliminary results obtained by embedding the 1-D plume-resolving model within the 3-D global chemistry transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate vertical transport of wildfire emissions during the ARCTAS campaign period.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
DE: 0368 Troposphere: constituent transport and chemistry
SC: Biogeosciences [B]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0087
TI: Influence of Biomass Burning and Mid-latitude Pollution on the Arctic Atmosphere During the ARCTAS Field Campaign: A Three Dimensional Modeling Analysis
AU: * Kulkarni, S
EM: sarika-kulkarni@uiowa.edu
AF: University of Iowa, Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research (CGRER), 424 IATL, Iowa City, IA 52241, United States
AU: Adhikary, B
EM: badhikar@engineering.uiowa.edu
AF: University of Iowa, Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research (CGRER), 424 IATL, Iowa City, IA 52241, United States
AU: Dallura, A
EM: alessio.dallura@gmail.com
AF: ARIANET Srl, Via Gilino n. 9, Milano, 20128, Italy
AU: Wei, C
EM: chawei@engineering.uiowa.edu
AF: University of Iowa, Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research (CGRER), 424 IATL, Iowa City, IA 52241, United States
AU: Carmichael, G
EM: gcarmich@engineering.uiowa.edu
AF: University of Iowa, Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research (CGRER), 424 IATL, Iowa City, IA 52241, United States
AU: Tang, Y
EM: Youhua.Tang@noaa.gov
AF: NOAA/NCEP/EMC, Meso-scale modeling, NOAA/NCEP/EMC, W/NP2, NOAA, WWB #207, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746, United States
AU: Streets, D
EM: dstreets@anl.gov
AF: Argonne National Laboratory, DIS/900 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, United States
AU: Zhang, Q
EM: zhangq@anl.gov
AF: Argonne National Laboratory, DIS/900 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, United States
AU: Pierce, R B
EM: r.b.pierce@larc.nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, NASA LaRC, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Al-Saadi, J A
EM: j.a.al-saadi@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, NASA LaRC, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Dibb, J E
EM: jack.dibb@unh.edu
AF: University of New Hampshire Climate Change Research Center, 8 College Road, Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Weinheimer, A J
EM: wein@ucar.edu
AF: National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Dr., Boulder, CO 80305, United States
AU: Diskin, G S
EM: glenn.s.diskin@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, NASA LaRC, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Weber, R J
EM: rweber@eas.gatech.edu
AF: School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, United States
AU: Jimenez, J
EM: jose.jimenez@colorado.edu
AF: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Department of Chemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Kondo, Y
EM: y.kondo@atmos.rcast.u-tokyo.ac.jp
AF: The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 153-8904, Japan
AB: The Arctic Research on the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) field campaign took place during the spring (April 1-21) and summer (June 26-July 12) of 2008. The major objectives of this mission were to study the long range transport pathways of pollution (spring phase) to the Arctic and assess the impact of biomass burning (summer phase) on the Arctic atmosphere. Multiple observations platforms including satellites, aircrafts, and surface stations were deployed during the mission to understand the chemistry and composition of the Arctic atmosphere. The University of Iowa's Sulfur Transport and dEpostion model (STEM), a comprehensive 3-dimensional regional scale model, provided high resolution chemical weather forecasts to support the intensive aircraft measurements and to assist in interpreting the observations. In this study, we will present the results of the inter-comparison of the model trace gas and aerosol distributions with the aircraft observations. Further insights into the source receptor relationships of trace gases and aerosols using air mass trajectories and regional emission tracers will be shown to characterize the evolution of pollution and thereby improve our current understanding of the Arctic chemistry and composition.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0345 Pollution: urban and regional (0305, 0478, 4251)
DE: 0365 Troposphere: composition and chemistry
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: IN41A-1118
TI: Enhancements and Evolution of the Real Time Mission Monitor
AU: * Goodman, M
EM: michael.goodman@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805, United States
AU: Blakeslee, R
EM: rich.blakeslee@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805, United States
AU: Hardin, D
EM: dhardin@itsc.uah.edu
AF: The University of Alabama in Huntsville, 301 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899, United States
AU: Hall, J
EM: john.hall@nasa.gov
AF: The University of Alabama in Huntsville, 301 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899, United States
AU: He, Y
EM: mhe@itsc.uah.edu
AF: The University of Alabama in Huntsville, 301 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899, United States
AU: Regner, K
EM: kregner@itsc.uah.edu
AF: The University of Alabama in Huntsville, 301 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899, United States
AB: The Real Time Mission Monitor (RTMM) is a visualization and information system that fuses multiple Earth science data sources, to enable real time decision-making for airborne and ground validation experiments. Developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center, RTMM is a situational awareness, decision-support system that integrates satellite imagery, radar, surface and airborne instrument data sets, model output parameters, lightning location observations, aircraft navigation data, soundings, and other applicable Earth science data sets. The integration and delivery of this information is made possible using data acquisition systems, network communication links, network server resources, and visualizations through the Google Earth virtual earth application. RTMM has proven extremely valuable for optimizing individual Earth science airborne field experiments. Flight planners, mission scientists, instrument scientists and program managers alike appreciate the contributions that RTMM makes to their flight projects. RTMM has received numerous plaudits from a wide variety of scientists who used RTMM during recent field campaigns including the 2006 NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA), 2007 Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4), 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) missions, the 2007-2008 NOAA-NASA Aerosonde Hurricane flights and the 2008 Soil Moisture Active-Passive Validation Experiment (SMAP-VEX). Improving and evolving RTMM is a continuous process. RTMM recently integrated the Waypoint Planning Tool, a Java-based application that enables aircraft mission scientists to easily develop a pre-mission flight plan through an interactive point-and-click interface. Individual flight legs are automatically calculated for altitude, latitude, longitude, flight leg distance, cumulative distance, flight leg time, cumulative time, and satellite overpass intersections. The resultant flight plan is then generated in KML and quickly posted to the Google Earth-based RTMM for planning discussions, as well as comparisons to real time flight tracks in progress. A description of the system architecture, components, and applications along with reviews and animations of RTMM during the field campaigns, plus planned enhancements and future opportunities will be presented.
UR: http://rtmm.nsstc.nasa.gov/
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 3311 Clouds and aerosols
SC: Earth and Space Informatics [IN]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A11A-0081
TI: Submicron Aerosol Composition during the ARCTAS campaign: Arctic Haze, Biomass Burning, and California Pollution
AU: * Cubison, M J
EM: michael.cubison@colorado.edu
AF: CIRES, UCB 216 Univ. Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Sueper, D
EM: sueper@aerodyne.com
AF: Aerodyne Res. Inc., 45 Manning Rd, Billerica, MA 01821, United States
AU: Sueper, D
EM: sueper@aerodyne.com
AF: CIRES, UCB 216 Univ. Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Dunlea, E
EM: edward.dunlea@colorado.edu
AF: CIRES, UCB 216 Univ. Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Jimenez, J L
EM: jose.jimenez@colorado.edu
AF: CIRES, UCB 216 Univ. Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Jimenez, J L
EM: jose.jimenez@colorado.edu
AF: Dept. Chem. Biochem., UCB 216 Univ. Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, United States
AU: Weinheimer, A
EM: weinheimer@ucar.edu
AF: NCAR, Foothills Lab Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80307, United States
AU: Knapp, D
EM: knapp@ucar.edu
AF: NCAR, Foothills Lab Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80307, United States
AU: Dibb, J
EM: jack.dibb@unh.edu
AF: Univ. New Hampshire, 131 Main Street, Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Schauer, E
EM: eric.schauer@unh.edu
AF: Univ. New Hampshire, 131 Main Street, Durham, NH 03824, United States
AU: Diskin, G
EM: glen.diskin@nasa.gov
AF: NASA, Langley Res. Ctr., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Sachse, G
EM: glen.w.sachse@nasa.gov
AF: NASA, Langley Res. Ctr., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Anderson, B
EM: b.e.anderson@larc.nasa.gov
AF: NASA, Langley Res. Ctr., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Thornhill, L
EM: Kenneth.L.Thornhill@nasa.gov
AF: NASA, Langley Res. Ctr., Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Wisthaler, A
EM: armin.wisthaler@uibk.ac.at
AF: Univ. Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, Innsbruck, A6020, Austria
AU: Mikoviny, T
EM: tomas.mikoviny@uibk.ac.at
AF: Univ. Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, Innsbruck, A6020, Austria
AU: Wennberg, P
EM: wennberg@caltech.edu
AF: Cal. Inst. Tech., 1200 E. California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125, United States
AU: Crounse, J
EM: crounjd@caltech.edu
AF: Cal. Inst. Tech., 1200 E. California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125, United States
AB: A High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, DeCarlo et al., Anal. Chem., 2006) was deployed aboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft as part of the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) campaign during the spring and summer of 2008. One focus of the spring phase, operated out of Fairbanks, AK, was to investigate the composition and sources of Arctic Haze (see e.g. Quinn et al., Tellus B, 2007), a persistent pollution layer that accumulates under the stable springtime Polar High anti-cyclonic weather pattern. Results are presented comparing the sulfate-dominated composition of the Arctic Haze with observed North American pollution and biomass- burning layers. A further objective of the spring phase was to investigate halogen chemistry at the sea-ice surface. High-resolution spectra clearly show bromine in the aerosol phase in the marine boundary layer during periods of ozone depletion, and relate this to concurrent gas-phase observations aboard the DC-8. During the summer phase, operated out of Palmdale, CA and Cold Lake, Alberta, the focus was investigating pollution in California and the composition and evolution of the outflow from large-scale boreal forest fires, respectively. Using recently-developed software that enabled the AMS to sample at 1 Hz, the smoke plumes could be clearly differentiated from the background aerosol, detailed vertical profiles were measured during spiral descents and aerosol volatility was characterized with a thermodenuder. Aerosol biomass-burning markers exhibit high correlation with gas-phase fire markers for both Canadian boreal and Californian forest fires. Emission ratios and composition (e.g. inorganic species, organic O/C) are characterized for the different fires. Data from smoke plumes sampled over the extensive summer fires in California provide a contrast in emission profiles to the Canadian boreal biomass-burning aerosol. Finally, aerosol pollution in Southern CA and the Central Valley is analyzed and compared to previous studies.
DE: 0300 ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


HR: 0800h
AN: A41A-0082
TI: Combining Active and Passive Measurements for Aerosol Retrievals
AU: * Ottaviani, M
EM: mottavia@stevens.edu
AF: NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025, United States
AU: Knobelspiesse, K D
EM: kdk2103@columbia.edu
AF: Columbia University, Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, 500 W. 120th St., New York, NY 10027, United States
AU: Knobelspiesse, K D
EM: kdk2103@columbia.edu
AF: NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025, United States
AU: Cairns, B
EM: cairnbrian@gmail.com
AF: NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025, United States
AU: Hostetler, C A
EM: chris.a.hostetler@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, NASA/LaRC, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Ferrare, R A
EM: richard.a.ferrare@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, NASA/LaRC, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Hair, J W
EM: Johnathan.W.Hair@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, NASA/LaRC, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Obland, M D
EM: m.d.obland@nasa.gov
AF: Science Systems and Applications, 1 Enterprise Parkway, Hampton, VA 23666, United States
AU: Obland, M D
EM: m.d.obland@nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, NASA/LaRC, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Rogers, R R
EM: r.r.rogers@larc.nasa.gov
AF: Science Systems and Applications, 1 Enterprise Parkway, Hampton, VA 23666, United States
AU: Rogers, R R
EM: r.r.rogers@larc.nasa.gov
AF: NASA Langley Research Center, NASA/LaRC, Hampton, VA 23681, United States
AU: Clarke, A D
EM: tclarke@soest.hawaii.edu
AF: University of Hawaii at Manoa, Dept. of Oceanography, 1000 Pope Rd., Honolulu, HI 96822, United States
AB: The NASA Langley Research Center B200 aircraft which participated in the ARCTAS 2008 campaign carried the passive Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) and the active High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) instrumentation during the summer deployment. These sensors have complementary retrieval capabilities, with the RSP measurements providing a detailed microphysics retrieval capability with limited sensitivity to the details of vertical structure, and the HSRL providing high resolution vertical profile information with a limited (5 pieces of information) microphysical capability. The ideal outcome of a retrieval is to provide the aerosol/cloud model (i.e., vertical distribution of properties) which fits the datasets best in a statistical sense. Within the Maximum A-posteriori Probability (MAP) method an a-priori knowledge of the state is combined with a χ2-statistics measuring the distance between observations and simulation, weighted through a proper estimate of the errors involved. The MAP is then found by minimizing this expression through Newton- Gauss or Levenberg-Marquardt iterations. This paper focuses on two aspects of the integrated retrieval approach. The first is an examination of the efficient integration of the HSRL and RSP data sets with a particular focus on the effects of calibration accuracy, and using the iterative retrieval process itself to determine which sets of measurements are important for any given retrieval. This type of analysis provides one of the criteria for an evaluation of which capabilities are necessary from the perspective of defining the next generation of passive and active remote sensing instruments, and which ones can be relaxed or eliminated depending on a specific science deliverable. The second aspect is an evaluation of the retrievals against in-situ measurements that are used to evaluate whether the retrievals are good and, if they are not, whether the prior information or errors in the modeling of the atmosphere and instruments are the source of error. This analysis is essential in the evaluation of observational data sets and the retrieval algorithms used to analyze them in order to ensure that any significant bias errors are appropriately allocated between the assumed prior information, modeling errors and instrumental errors. For example, aerosol layer top and base heights may be important in passive remote sensing retrievals, but are not always included in the modeling of the observed radiation field. The ARCTAS data set is rich in multi-layered aerosol conditions, aerosols above clouds and aerosols above glint from lakes all of which provide valuable testbeds for the development and evaluation of new and better ways to realize the synergy between active and passive measurements.
DE: 0305 Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801, 4906)
DE: 0360 Radiation: transmission and scattering
DE: 3311 Clouds and aerosols
DE: 3359 Radiative processes
DE: 3360 Remote sensing
SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A]
MN: 2008 Fall Meeting


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